12 Books Recommended By Steve Jobs

1. 1984, by George Orwell

The novel is set in Airstrip One (formerly known as Great Britain), a province of the superstate Oceania in a world of perpetual war, omnipresent government surveillance and public manipulation, dictated by a political system euphemistically named English Socialism (or Ingsoc in the government’s invented language, Newspeak) under the control of a privileged elite of the Inner Party, that persecutes individualism and independent thinking as “thoughtcrime.”

2. Atlas Shrugged, by Ayn Rand

Atlas Shrugged is the astounding story of a man who said that he would stop the motor of the world — and did. Tremendous in scope, breathtaking in its suspense, Atlas Shrugged stretches the boundaries further than any book you have ever read.

3. Autobiography of a Yogi, by Paramahansa Yogananda

Autobiography of a Yogi is an eloquently written story of an extraordinary life and an inspiring meditation on the art of yoga. Written decades ago, this poignant autobiography still has ample vigor and relevance in today’s world.

4. Be Here Now, by Baba Ram Dass

A Lama Foundation Book. Describes one man’s transformation upon his acceptance of the principles of Yoga and gives a modern restatement of the importance of the spiritual side of man’s nature.

5. Cutting Through Spiritual Materialism, by Chögyam Trungpa

In this modern spiritual classic, the Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa highlights the commonest pitfall to which every aspirant on the spiritual path falls prey: what he calls spiritual materialism. The universal tendency, he shows, is to see spirituality as a process of self-improvement — the impulse to develop and refine the ego when the ego is, by nature, essentially empty. “

6. Diet for a Small Planet, by Frances Moore Lappe

Here again is the extraordinary bestselling book that taught America the social and personal significance of a new way of eating — one that remains a complete guide for eating well in the 90s. Featuring: simple rules for a healthy diet; a streamlined, easy-to-use format; delicious food combinations of protein-rich meals without meat; hundreds of wonderful recipes, and much more.

7. Inside the Tornado, by Geoffrey A. Moore

Once a product “crosses the chasm” it is faced with the “tornado,” a make or break time period where mainstream customers determine whether the product takes off or falls flat. In Inside the Tornado, Moore details various marketing strategies that will teach marketers how reach these customers and how to take advantage of living inside the tornado in order to reap the benefits of mainstream adoption.

8. Moby Dick, by Herman Melville

Herman Melville is known today primarily for his iconic whaling novel, Moby Dick (1851), the story of the struggle between Captain Ahab and “the great white whale,” which appears on many lists of “greatest books ever written” and is considered an essential part of the Western Canon. Ironically, when the novel was published it was a monumental flop and signaled the end of Melvilles’s career as a novelist.

9. Only the Paranoid Survive, by Andrew S. Grove

Under Andy Grove’s leadership, Intel has become the world’s largest chip maker and one of the most admired companies in the world. In Only the Paranoid Survive, Grove reveals his strategy of focusing on a new way of measuring the nightmare moment every leader dreads — when massive change occurs and a company must, virtually overnight, adapt or fall by the wayside.

10. The Innovator’s Dilemma, by Clayton Christensen

The Innovator’s Dilemma is the revolutionary business book that has forever changed corporate America. Based on a truly radical idea — that great companies can fail precisely because they do everything right — this Wall Street Journal, Business Week and New York Times Business bestseller is one of the most provocative and important business books ever written. Entrepreneurs, managers, and CEOs ignore its wisdom and its warnings at their great peril.

11. The Tao of Programming, by Geoffrey James

Something mysterious is formed, born in the silent void. Waiting alone and unmoving, it is at once still and yet in constant motion. It is the source of all programs. I do not know its name, so I will call it the Tao of Programming.

If the Tao is great, then the operating system is great. If the operating system is great, then the compiler is great. If the compiler is great, then the application is great. The user is pleased and there exists harmony in the world.

12. Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, by Shunryu Suzuki

So begins this most beloved of all American Zen books. Seldom has such a small handful of words provided a teaching as rich as has this famous opening line. In a single stroke, the simple sentence cuts through the pervasive tendency students have of getting so close to Zen as to completely miss what it’s all about. An instant teaching on the first page. And that’s just the beginning.

Like what you read? Give The Book Advisor a round of applause.

From a quick cheer to a standing ovation, clap to show how much you enjoyed this story.