Photo by Fancycrave on Unsplash

Better Experience #10: Online Fitting Rooms 👕👗

Eluding the stress of ordering the wrong size of clothes

Briandito Priambodo
Jan 15 · 4 min read

Better Experience Design is a collection of arbitrary encounters with everyday things that have given us either delightful or stressful experience.


1. What is it and what is the purpose?

Size charts are often found in online shops to give information about the different sizes that the shop has.

An example of a size chart. Source

2. Why/When did I use it?

When buying clothes online, you need to choose the right size that fits you the best. Most of the time, you have to know the measurements of your height, chest, waist, and neck.

3. Was it a delightful or stressful experience? Why?

To be honest, most size charts are confusing. Here’s why:

How would you know your sizes?

As stated above, most shops gave us information about the chest, waist, and neck size. But the problem is; how do we know our own size?

Happens every time
Amazon’s size chart. Source

Too much information to process

Some companies understood that people need to have proper size charts and a guide to measure their sizes. However, in some cases — like this Uniqlo size chart — they put too much effort in doing so. They missed the point.

An example of a size chart from Uniqlo. Source

Visual clutters adds distraction and dissociates people from the essential information.

4. Can it be better?

I think so. Some additions to the size charts and we’re good to go:

Let the user input their own measurements and match them with a size

Zara has made it easy for their customers to find the right size. They match the size with the customer’s measurements and how tight/loose they want the clothes to be.

Input your measurements and how you want the clothes to fit. Source

Put your customer data to a good use

To top it off, Zara adds customer insights to reassure that you are choosing the right size. This is a smart move from Zara — the usage of data adds value to the size chart and made it more trustworthy. They give just the right amount of information the user needs.

The right amount of info. You can also contribute to the data by adding your info. Source

Ask for the customer’s body shape info

Along with height and weight, ASOS asks some additional information such as body shape and how do you want the clothes to fit you. This adds confirmation that as a customer, I will most likely get the right size.

Asos asks for your body shape information. Source

Use actual images of people to represent the customer’s sizes

One of the easiest way to get the right size. Source

It would be perfect if companies provide size charts where we just need to input our measurements and get some examples of how it would look like based on our body type — something that can actually help us in choosing the right size.

5. What do you think?

We think this might make a better experience of ordering clothes online and hopefully get the right size every time we order. What do you think?


Better Experience Design is a collection of arbitrary encounters with everyday things that have given us either delightful or stressful experience.

Better Experience Design

Better Experience Design is a collection of arbitrary encounters with everyday things that have given us either delightful or stressful experience.

Briandito Priambodo

Written by

https://briandito.co - Product Designer and Writer

Better Experience Design

Better Experience Design is a collection of arbitrary encounters with everyday things that have given us either delightful or stressful experience.

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