Dear Health Habits,

Since you are a personal trainer, it makes total sense that you would encourage your clients to be fit and to reduce their body fat percentages to a “healthy” level. I’m not going to argue with that; after all, your clients pay you to share with them your best knowledge of how and why they should chose to follow your nutrition and exercise advice.

What I will argue with is your assumption that everyone—not just your clients—should be as obsessed with your sanctimonious, visually-based definition of health.Your word choice belies your inherent prejudice against anyone who displays a less than stellar physical appearance and, it seems, you also assume that if someone is not following your very narrow dictates of fitness, they are “sabotaging their health goals,” which makes them completely deserving of your judgmental “No Excuses” mentality.

I teach group fitness at a YMCA, and my participants there are usually the polar opposite of your finely-tuned, (probably) wealth-privileged clients. These participants expect very little personal attention from me,and while I might know their names, where they work and what their kids’ names are, I don’t often have the chance to offer personalized advice on nutrition or frequency of workouts. My job is to lead them for an hour, to improve their fitness in only the most generic way. Many of them will never get thinner, some of them will not even be measurably more healthy. My best hope is that if they have the opportunity to make a choice to attend a class, I can be there to support them in that choice and that in the long run they benefit from that choice in some small way and will want to come back if they can.

Your clients probably pay you a lot of money to remind them to make good choices. Being super fit is a privilege of wealth and leisure; it takes a lot of time and a lot of focused effort to maintain. For a majority of people, devoting that much time and energy to physical self-perfection is not even an option, or honestly, a priority.

Every single bullet point you list as a “choice” in your piece is entirely predicated on the assumption that every fat person has the financial resources to make that better choice. You assume everyone has TV, cable and Internet access. You assume everyone has access to healthy food and time to cook. You assume everyone has health insurance and disposable income.Look around buddy, I think a good percentage of the people you are trying to publicly shame are struggling to make ends meet, feed and raise their kids, keep the heat and lights on and try to stay as healthy as they can with the very limited options available to them. So yes, I’ll call you out as a fat hater, because all those people you are so happy to judge for “blaming outside sources,” don’t have time for your hate, and they really don’t care what you think. Save your advice for your paying clients and leave everyone else alone.