Whether you use a favorite Moleskine or Evernote on every device, your favorite notebook can enrich your life. Here’s three articles to help you make the most of it.

Coach Tony
Mar 9, 2018 · 3 min read

A New (to me) Concept for Keeping a Notebook

I am a Commonplace Book convert. You should be, too.

by Shaunta Grimes

I’m not a stranger to keeping a notebook. I’ve kept one most of my life.

I’m not talking about a journal. I’ve never been great at journaling. This isn’t a reflective thing. Just a notebook for writing down my ideas or other people’s thoughts or what other people have to teach me.

I didn’t know that there was an official name for the kind of notebook I keep.
The kind that I carry around with me and write lists, bits of eavesdropped conversation, notes from a meeting, recipes, reminders, quotes, ideas for projects. Read more.


Photo by Martin Reisch on Unsplash

How To Expand Your Brain And Think Clearly With Evernote

by Coach Niklas Goeke

Google counts almost 200 billion searches each month. That’s 26 for every person on the planet. But how many of those are successful? How many are just follow-ups to previous, failed searches? It’s not just that the explosion of data is incomprehensible, we also have to learn an entirely new language: the language of search engines.

So when we dismiss memorizing information, we can only confidently do that when we practice another skill instead. A skill that’s poised to become the competitive advantage of the 21st century: filtering information.

Over the past four years, I’ve built a system using Evernote that helps me do just that. It’s an external brain with shortcuts to the data I need most often and a cave I can retreat into when I need to think.

Here are four ways you can use Evernote to free space in your mind and become more efficient at organizing and retrieving information. Read more.

Photo by Dean Hochman.

Replace Your To-Do List With Interstitial Journaling To Increase Productivity

A new journaling tactic that immediately kills procrastination and boosts creative insights.

by Coach Tony Stubblebine

We weren’t built for multi-tasking, so transitions between projects are very tough. We end up getting lost in procrastination. Even when we manage to transition quickly into our next project, our brain is still thinking about the last project.

That means our second project suffers from partial attention. The science of multi-tasking says partial attention can mean a 40% or more reduction in cognitive performance.

The Interstitial Journaling tactic solves all of these normal problems. It kills procrastination, empties our brain of the last project, and then gives us space to formulate an optimal strategy for our next project. Read more.

Better Humans

Better Humans is a collection of the world's most trustworthy writing on human potential and self improvement by coaches, academics, and aggressive self-experimenters. Articles are based on deep personal experience, science, and research. No fluff, book reports, or listicles.

Coach Tony

Written by

Evangelist for great coaches and excellent personal development advice. CEO/Founder of Coach.me. Publisher of Better Humans & Better Programming.

Better Humans

Better Humans is a collection of the world's most trustworthy writing on human potential and self improvement by coaches, academics, and aggressive self-experimenters. Articles are based on deep personal experience, science, and research. No fluff, book reports, or listicles.

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