5 Android Libraries to Inspire the Designer in You

Some Dribbble designs with good implementations in Android

Anupam Chugh
Jan 2 · 3 min read
Photo by Stephen Frank on Unsplash

While Material Design is Google’s strong suit and every Android developer should know the guidelines like the back of their hand, often many of them are found wanting when they’re asked to adhere to a certain UI/UX flow in their applications. Dribbble is the most popular and useful resource to keep yourself updated with the latest design trends in the industry. Bringing Dribbble designs to reality through code is something every front end developer cherishes.

The following section is all about motivating you to code awesome Dribbble designs in your Android applications. We’ll walk through a few awesome Dribbble designs with their open-source implementations with the goal to inspire you to convert your favorite UI designs to code. Let’s get started!


1. FitnessChallenge

First up we have an implementation of a Dribbble design from a fitness app prototype that showcases fluid motion, fade animation, and transition effects on user interaction.


2. ContextMenu

Next up, we have an animated context menu design implemented in Android. It’s a pretty decent substitute for a mini side navigation drawer.


3. Pull to Refresh — Printer

Here’s a great pull to refresh android implementation of a very creative Dribbble shot that comes with a translation and scale effect on the RecyclerView content.

4. LightProgress

Next what we have is a blend of a ProgressBar and a Shimmer effect. This library allows you to create a cool lighting animation on the text.

<com.bitvale.lightprogress.LightProgress
android:id="@+id/light"
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
android:textSize="@dimen/text_size"
android:textColor="@color/text_color"
android:text="@string/light_text"
app:light_color="@color/light_color"/>

5. Switcher

To end things, we have an uber-cool switch design implementation useful for any toggle options in your applications.

Once you’ve added the Gradle dependency, all you need to do is add the following view in your XML, set the color for the various states and optionally handle the change in states in your Kotlin code.

<com.bitvale.switcher.SwitcherX
android:id="@+id/switcher"
android:layout_width="wrap_content"
android:layout_height="wrap_content"
app:switcher_on_color="@color/on_color"
app:switcher_off_color="@color/off_color"
app:switcher_icon_color="@color/icon_color" />

Conclusion

We saw a range of different Dribbble designs with their counterpart implementations in Android. I hope these design concept turned reality in code inspire you to produce your own implementations of Dribbble shots to give your apps a fresh new look.

That’s a wrap for now.

Better Programming

Advice for programmers.

Anupam Chugh

Written by

iOS Developer exploring the depths of ML and AR on Mobile. Loves writing about thoughts, technology and code. Blogging weekly at iowncode.com

Better Programming

Advice for programmers.

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