Movers & Shakers: Emanuel Hahn and Jeannie Huang

We’re all about cool people doing cool things with Breather. From innovative startups to creatives to amazing business minds, this section highlights all the ways Breather fits your work life.


Describe what you both do.

Emanuel: I am a freelance photographer based in New York. I was working at a startup until 6 months ago, I decided to quit my job to pursue my passion of photography.

Jeannie: I am a product designer at Adobe, but floral design is a favorite side project that I love to work on. At work I design for screens, so I like the tactile nature of working with wild things.

Have you worked together before?

Emanuel: The Anadem Project was our first big collaboration together, but we’ve been working as part of a bigger design team at our church. The two of us lead a team of designers, illustrators, and photographers there, so we’ve gotten used to collaborating on large projects over time.

How did the Anadem Project come to fruition?

Jeannie: The Anadem Project started when I was hanging out with a close friend of mine, and a vision of her popped into my head of her covered with light and with leaves cascading down the side of her face. I really wanted to make that image a reality, and I knew Emanuel could really grasp that vision and create it with me.

Emanuel: We asked that friend to model for us, booked a Breather room, and tried on an arrangement. We really enjoyed the collaboration and quickly realized that our aesthetic was very similar and wanted to expand these photoshoots into a series.

Jeannie: For me, the magic really comes from seeing and knowing the model first, and then finding seasonal flowers/foliage that matches how I personally envision them. We always try to find models who we know personally, because the Anadem Project hinges on expressing the model’s character and personality through the florals.

Can you describe your experience collaborating on this project?

Emanuel: It’s been a fantastic experience. Jeannie is the creative director, picking out the look for each model and arranging the flowers while I work with each model to get the right framing, mood and aesthetic of the shot. Collaborating instantly expands your creative potential because you have two creative minds exploring ideas and possibilities. Very often, the final image looks much better than what would have been possible if only one person was working on it. Jeannie and I have a very good understanding of what our shared vision is and we often share inspiration photos with each other so that we stay unified in our vision.

Jeannie: We named this the Anadem Project because the word “anadem” is literally defined as “a wreath for the head,” but we’re starting to explore other ways that we can shoot portraits of people with botanical objects. Working together has opened up new ways to see people, light, and objects for me, because Emanuel brings his own fresh interpretations of what we can do on top of the simple floral arrangements I’ve done in the past.

What is a piece of advice for someone looking to collaborate?

Emanuel: Find someone to work with that you respect and share a similar vision with. When you work with someone like that, it becomes easier to set aside personal ego and become focused on the excellence of the end product. The back and forth with Jeannie worked well because we fully trusted each other in our respective abilities.


Follow more of Emanuel and Jeannie’s work on Instagram. Let’s do something amazing together.

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