Along our way of making the Bluebird App, we’ve learned a lot about how our brain works, especially when it comes to neuroplasticity — the way a brain gradually changes itself in response to the environment.

Scientists used to believe that only a child’s brain is plastic. Not any more. Neuroplasticity happens for everyone throughout a lifetime, although the process can be challenging after we’ve grown up. That’s some very good news for us adults.

So we believe that anyone can benefit from understanding the brain, from learning how to change our brain in the way we’d like it to happen. And there are good resources.

  1. Livewired by David Eagleman begins with a famous quote:

Every man is born as many men and dies as a single one. — Martin Heidegger

Throughout the book, one learns that a brain can be shaped, that everyone can become the sculptor of his/her own brain. It presents us all the reasons to change ourselves and become someone anew. It’s possible. “The thrill of life is not about who we are but about who we are in the process of becoming.”

2. The Molecule of More by Daniel Z. Lieberman and Michael E. Long talks about the neurotransmitter dopamine. Too often it is called “a reward molecule”, which can be misleading. Dopamine is the pursuit of better things, it “maximize resources that will be available to us in the future.” It plays a critical role in every aspect of our life, from love to creativity to politics. Only by understanding the way dopamine works can we stop being the slaves of our own wanting and start attaining true happiness.

3. The Brain’s Way of Healing by Norman Doidge focuses more on the brain’s ability to repair itself through neuroplasticity. The mechanisms behind acute and chronic pain are not the same — chronic pain is a “learned pain” when our body’s alarm system is constantly “on”. And there’re ways to overcome it.

4. How Emotions are Made by Lisa Feldman Barrett pictures emotions in a way that can contradict everyone’s intuition. We all have feelings, but it doesn’t mean we’re always right about how we feel, and why we feel in a certain way.

5. Animals in Translation by Temple Grandin concentrates on animal brains, from which we can better understand ourselves. Human brains have inattentional blindness while animal brains see all the details. Human brains are verbal while animal brains are visual. Human brains have mixed feelings while animal brains are always certain. Along the path of evolution, things happen, and we’re merely in the process of it.

In the end, if reading a book is not your thing, we strongly recommend Andrew Huberman’s Huberman Lab podcast. Dr. Huberman is one of the best educators out there who can make complex neuroscience topics easy to understand and fun to learn. Don’t miss it.

The human brain works in a use-it-or-lose-it way. There’s no excuse not to learn. The human brain is plastic by default. There’s no reason not to change. We only live once, but we have unlimited possibilities. Kahlil Gibran once wrote:

Say not, "I have found the path of the soul.” Say rather, “I have met the soul walking upon my path.”

For the soul walks upon all paths.

The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.

The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals.

We all have ever-unfolding becomings.

Bluebird 2.0 is available for download on the App Store.

About us

Bluebird is made by Cub & Pup, a two-person indie team. We craft apps that bring joy to your life, with lots of love ❤️.

Find us on Twitter

Comics: @IndieLifeComics | Developer: @limited_dfs | Designer: @topologiraffe

Say not, "I have found the path of the soul.” Say rather, “I have met the soul walking upon my path.”
For the soul walks upon all paths.
The soul walks not upon a line, neither does it grow like a reed.
The soul unfolds itself, like a lotus of countless petals.

Designer. Crafting Bluebird.