Borderland Blooms
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Borderland Blooms

Fences through the borderlands

The wall along the border between the United States and Mexico is not an unbroken construction running uniformly from one end to the other of the whole border.

Over place, and even over time, it changes in construction and appearance and each variation affects the people, animals and plants that live around it.

The following are glimpses of the U.S.-Mexico border between the states of Arizona and Sonora including a controlled cattle crossing in eastern Douglas, through ranches and canyons, across the heart of the split city of Nogales to the sand and water of Yuma Sector.

Agua Prieta, Son. — 9 April 2016

Douglas, Ariz. — 7 April 2016

Naco, Ariz. — 9 April 2016

Nogales, Son. — 25 June 2010

Nogales, Ariz. — June 2010, November 2012 and October 2015

June 2010 (above) & November 2012 (below)
November 2012 (above) & October 2015 (below)

Walker Canyon, Ariz. — 14 April 2012 and 24 May 2014

14 April 2012 (above) & 24 May 2014 (below)

Sasabe, Ariz. —20 February 2010 & 20 October 2015

20 February 2010 (above) / 20 October 2015 (below)

Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Ariz. — 5 April 2016

Eastern Yuma Sector, Ariz. —11 April 2013

San Luis, Ariz. — 28 September 2010

Western Yuma Sector, Ariz. —11 April 2013

Imperial Sand Dunes, Ca. — 3 November 2015

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Organ Pipe blooms amidst the Wall (U.S. — Mexico border)

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Rebekah Zemansky

Rebekah Zemansky

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writer & reporter. 📝 Phoenix based. 🏜 ♥s pups/reading/travel & other random things. 🐶🐱 alum @cronkitenews, @news21 & @KUnews. 🎓 http://rebekahzemansky.c