Being a Quiet Survivalist

It‘s no big deal getting prepared for the worst

Derek Reinhard
Bouncin’ and Behavin’ Blogs
5 min readMar 21, 2024

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Man standing in a partially open, backlit doorway
Photo by Milo Bauman on Unsplash

Apocalypse Begins at Home

Back in the 70’s, my parents got religion. It wasn’t the bible-thumping, snake-holding kind, it was the-end-is-nigh kind. Their bookshelves were full of instruction manuals about surviving an economic collapse because of a nuclear detonation and/or societal upheaval.

There were cases of food and water storage options, first aid kits (including treating gunshot wounds), and guns, of course. I remember seeing a book with a map of the United States showing major wind patterns and geologic fault lines to determine the healthiest places to live in case of nuclear fallout or earthquakes (Eugene, Oregon, you’ve got it made).

In retrospect, the only thing I found disheartening was that they didn’t seem to have plans for taking us kids along with them— I know teenagers suck and they are smelly, but c’mon, Ma!

Some 50 years on, it’s my turn to take a jaundiced look at the world and decide how my wife and I (and our ENTIRE family, sheesh!) might weather unexpected disasters and upheaval.

Really? I mean, REALLY?

One of the first steps to becoming a prepper with any level of seriousness is acknowledging (or at least…

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Derek Reinhard
Bouncin’ and Behavin’ Blogs

Writes quirky life, productivity, and relationship stuff (uses the Oxford comma). Author of 3 books on GTD and a couple coloring books.