Landscaping connectivity

A recent thought on blurring streets and parks in Stockholm echoes an older thought on spatially shaping connectivity and informational intensity on Barangaroo, Sydney

Dan Hill
But what was the question?

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In a recent piece on adapting Holger Blom’s landscaping principles from 1940s parks to today’s streets, I suggested we might think about a blurred, shifting continuum of park-like conditions—biodiverse and culturally diverse activities and environments—moving from streets to gardens to parks. This, as opposed to the traditional binary opposition between parks (‘the lungs of the city’) and streets (its hardened arteries.)

As I noted, this almost suggested a canopy forming over the city, describing something akin to how Melbourne’s Urban Forest Strategy will help protect the city against otherwise intense heat at street level, as well as giving us the numerous other benefits that street trees provide. And in that, there are also echoes of the way I imagined the density of urban fabric suturing together the spaces in Barcelona’s Ciutat Vella — what Joan Busquets called an ability for the urban environment to “reform from within”—yet via rather more benevolent trees, as opposed to stone.

Such a leafy fibrous cityscape is obviously far more appealing that Buckminster Fuller’s…

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Dan Hill
But what was the question?

Designer, urbanist, etc. Director of Melbourne School of Design. Previously, Swedish gov, Arup, UCL IIPP, Fabrica, Helsinki Design Lab, BBC etc