Mangroves in danger of long-term survival

Learn about facts that can redefine humanity

Andrey Chi de Robles
CARRE4
3 min readNov 16, 2020

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A study found that one of the most valuable ecosystems in the world, with the greatest biodiversity and protection of the coast, is under the risk of three different threats: the rise in sea level, the lack of mud and the reduction of its habitats.

Historic hurricane season

For the first time, three named storms were spinning at this point in the year. The hurricane season should be ending but it seems to be in full swing. Previous research suggests that hurricanes around the world move more slowly, which is why they stagnate more, this due to the climate change that causes the warm waters. The emission of greenhouse gases increases at a rapid rate creating extreme rains called hundred-year storms that probably occur once every 33 years, these are low probability but high consequence events. Increasing the number of floods year after year and the number of people exposed.

They capture the image of the elusive deep-sea squid.

The Magnapinna squid is one of the most elusive creatures, it lives in the permanently dark depths of the ocean and a sighting is extremely rare, around the world there are only a dozen confirmed sightings. Now he was seen off the shores of Australia and not just once but five times and each time he was a different individual.

Newly discovered primate is already in danger of extinction

Scientists identified a nine species of primate that lives in forests in central Myanmar. The stern langur houses the largest population which is about 100 individuals. With 200 to 250 specimens, experts recommend naming species that eat ojas as critically endangered. There are several species of langur and several of them are in danger of extinction.

Mammalian genome pool reveals endangered species

A team of researchers with an investigation called the Zoonomia Project has analyzed and compared the complete genomes of more than 80 percent of all mammalian families, spanning nearly 110 million years of evolution. By analyzing the new genomes, they found that mammalian species with high extinction rates have less genetic diversity. The findings suggest that sequencing even a single individual could provide crucial information on which populations may be most at risk of extinction.

Thanks so much for reading, see you next time.

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Andrey Chi de Robles
CARRE4

Ing, Student, Wise of much, Specialist of little, I´m not a robot, Human change not climate change. :)