7 Things You Should Think About When Considering Medication

To Medicate or Not-Part Two

The Good Men Project
Change Becomes You

--

Photo credit: iStock

By Tim Lineaweaver

Despite the positive experience I had getting on medication, I don’t immediately push the idea of medication at my clients. If someone has been in therapy with me for six months or longer and they haven’t seen a reduction of their significant depression and/or anxiety I may suggest it but as it was with me, the decision is theirs. I may push harder if someone has severe depression/anxiety.

If a client decides to go forward I suggest a psychiatrist who I know to be proficient presuming their insurance will cover. If not, I have the client develop a list of three providers that will accept their insurance and I research them. If the client is in recovery, I make sure that they agree to tell their psychiatrist this important information up front. I encourage the client to understand that the overall goal is to find the right medication at the right dose. I counsel patience knowing that many medications may take six to eight weeks to build to therapeutic benefit. Often a medication is ineffective at a starting dose, so a higher one is tried. If there is still no or minimal benefit, then a new medication may be tried. It can be a difficult and lengthy process of trial and error that requires patience and frustration tolerance.

--

--

The Good Men Project
Change Becomes You

We're having a conversation about the changing roles of men in the 21st century. Main site is https://goodmenproject.com Email us info@goodmenproject.com