ChasingProducts

After Sony’s PlayStation5 conference last night, the announcement pattern between themselves and Microsoft continues. Both companies are playing to their strengths, Sony with its best-in-class exclusive titles while Xbox is pushing its raw computing power performance.

Playstation 5, controller, headset and hd camera
Playstation 5, controller, headset and hd camera
PlayStation5 Product Lineup

The Plastic

I don’t think I’m alone in saying that I’m glad those renders of the PS5 leaked a few months ago proved to be non-representative for look of the final product. So what exactly is the ‘PS5 Lineup’ announced last night? There’s a lot to unpack, so we better get started…

PS5 dualsense controller in white
PS5 dualsense controller in white
DualSense Controller

A lot has been written about Sony’s new DualSense controller, most of it speculation, and the rest of it marketing spin coming from the company itself. ‘Haptic feedback’, ‘adaptive triggers’, ‘motion sensors’, ‘3D audio’ are all things mentioned by one source or the other, the fact of the matter is that none of us really know what all of this translates to in real life until someone puts their hands on the thing. The names of the new technologies sound like better versions of current features found in the DualShock controller but we’ll have to wait and see if they add to the gaming experience and if developers will actually use all these things in their games. …


As we draw closer to the release of the next generations of video games consoles this holiday season and with relentless news of more companies developing their own game streaming services, we can’t help but contemplate the future of video games going forward.

A photo inside an arcade with over-saturated neon lights behind the machines
A photo inside an arcade with over-saturated neon lights behind the machines
Photo by Carl Raw

While in previous articles I focused more on the dynamic between console manufacturers, Game Streaming Service Providers — GSSPs for short — and the impact on existing business models, the actions of various parties over the past months allow us to see a more accurate view of some possible scenarios and how they might influence game creators, gamers and others if they come to fruition. …


Books are switching from atoms to bits but old institutions are restricting the new evolution from reaching its full potential and from educating the next generation.

Very well lit public library with sloping roof made predominantly of glass on the right side
Very well lit public library with sloping roof made predominantly of glass on the right side
Photo by Sylvia Yang

It took literally thousands of years to get the written form of information to its existing form. From cuneiform glyphs on slabs of rock in public squares to the symbols we now perceive as the letters of an alphabet, from Greek or Latin scrolls ‘arranged’ in scriptio continua that could only have been understood if read out loud —imagine everyone reading all their books out loud today— to the relatively modern tools of punctuation and organizational features like page numbers, tables of content and later indexes when bound books replaced scrolls. …


The approach when trying to predict developments over a multi-decade time frame must be radically different to the two-year version, with exact predictions impossible to achieve, I’ll rely more on trends in order to forecast the ‘spirit’ of future innovations and map out a multitude of ways they could end up influencing our lives. …


I’ll admit it from the start, I sat down to writ this article with the intention of looking at some tech products bound to be unveiled over the next 12 months. The idea behind writing an article on here was to provide some extra pressure from possible challengers with the added bonus of being able to revisit it once the time is up and see how accurate these predictions were.

While this might have proven a somewhat worthy exercise 5+ years ago — a fact proven to some extent by the fact that old media institutions still indulge in the exercise — today’s zeitgeist puts this kind of effort just several Google searches away. With every assembly line employee having access to a global audience on social media, it feels like leaks of new devices and prototypes happen every second week, making even the newest of Twitter members aware of Apple’s latest AR prototype being developed halfway around the world. …


Image for post
Image for post

Gathering from the reaction we’ve seen in the two days after the launch, it’s safe to say the event served the purpose it was meant to: telling the world about a new Tesla model. Whether it was the features, the looks or the — intentionally or otherwise— botched glass demo, the news went viral everywhere in the usual Tesla way, with zero marketing spend and boosted by its loyal fan base, on one side, and meme-making internet trolls on the other.

Tesla’s new Cybertruck range of pickup trucks can reach 60mph in 6.5 to 2.9 seconds, have a range of 400–800 kilometers on a single charge, bulletproof body and glass, with prices starting from $39.900. Whilst demand for pickup trucks in the US¹ is made obvious by the sales numbers recorded by the likes of Ford, Chevy and Dodge the three manufacturers who dominate the segment in unit sales right now— the Cybertruck stands out in the field in both looks and capabilities. …


With computing power increasing exponentially in past decades more or less according to Moore’s law, there have been a lot of computing systems that thrived in the market without donning the latest, most powerful individual components. We’re talking about standardized systems here like gaming consoles or, more recently, smartphones and tablets, and not those easily upgradable by consumers via new components.

Out of all such hardware concoctions, when compared to other similar products in the market, Nintendo’s consoles more often than not feature out-of-date components the day they’re launched. …


Small figurine of Mario with arms extended out, sitting on a table
Small figurine of Mario with arms extended out, sitting on a table
Photo by Cláudio Luiz Castr

There was a trend more or less five years ago that led all APP developers, regardless of their product, integrate into their marketing materials what later became a 🤮-inducing word in the game development community: g**ification. Non-gaming companies started laying claim to the term in order to ride the seismic wave generated by mobile gaming at the time, a wave of stellar engagement, retention that eventually led the industry to big profits. …


Image for post
Image for post

Many a trend has come and passed in the 8 years I’ve been working mobile gaming, some good, others bad. Mostly the latter. Arcade is Apple’s attempt to fix the model that led to the current free-to-play race to the bottom which they, at least indirectly, helped create. And it’s a darn good effort right out of the gate.

I’ve been using Apple Arcade, mostly on my iPhone6s and AppleTV, in the past two weeks now and I’m glad to admit the experience has surpassed any of my initial expectations.

After playing just the first two or three titles in close succession I had a strange feeling that I just couldn’t place. While the so-called core gameplay — meaning the action phase of the game, like matching blocks of the same color, racing cars or attacking an enemy base — was familiar, something felt off in what’s called the metagame part, or the way various elements of the game interact with each other with the goal of 1)giving players a sense of progression through steadily increasing complexity and 2)making them interact with the game as for as much as possible. Over the past several years, as mobile games became predominantly free-to-play, the design of said games evolved with the purpose of serving the business model to the point where the consumer’s subconscious has been trained to expect his progress be slowed or altogether halted by one system or another that’s meant to make her spend money, not unlike in Dr. Pavlov’s research at the turn of the last century. …


A lot of reviews have streamed in the past week about every aspect of Apple’s latest operating system after it launched for phones last week, most of them understandably focused on how the new devices take advantage of the new features and how the experience compares to last year’s. For this reason I decided to make an account of how iOS13 behaves on the oldest phone supported in the release, the iPhone 6s Plus.

image of black rotary phone on a white background
image of black rotary phone on a white background
Photo by Quino Al

Let’s start with the beginning, the install process. The experience of updating from iOS12.3 to iOS13 took roughly fifty minutes, with the download of the taking 27 minutes on WiFi while the rest was taken up by the installation process itself. …

About

ChasingProducts

A series of posts about tech products that you can read in…

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store