Seeking Sanctuary: Refugees and Migrants Welcome at QMUL (Queen Mary University of London)

Join us for the event Seeking Sanctuary: Refugees and Migrants Welcome at QMUL (Queen Mary University of London)

On Thursday February 23rd 6–8. 30 pm.

At Peston Lecture Theatre, QMUL Graduate Centre, Mile End Road (entrance via Bancroft Road), London E1 4NS

This event is particularly important given the present political crises and the recent government’s backtracking on accepting child migrants under the Lord Dub’s ruling.

Book your free tickets through Eventbrite:

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Photograph courtesy of the Advanced School of Study, University of London. Copyright© Lloyd Sturdy[/caption]

A chance to:

- learn about experiences of child refugees and migrants coming to East London through films, memoir and music
- explore what the university and others are doing, and could do, to support refugees and how to get involved

6pm: Film Screenings
i) Passing Tides — story of Linh Vu who escaped Vietnam by boat followed by a reading from her father’s biography, A Catholic with Confucian Tendencies
ii) Ugwumpiti— story of Maurice Nwokeji who survived the Biafran civil war before joining his parents in East London

7pm: QMUL’s support for refugees today
Panel discussion including:
Emma Williams, Chief Executive of STAR (Student Action for Refugees) on University of Sanctuary initiatives and other work of STAR including the campaign on family reunification
Lizzy Pollard, Advice and Counselling Student Services, QMUL on financial support for asylum seeker and refugee students
Raneem Kalsoum, QMUL Syria Solidarity Society

Followed by a wine reception and refreshments with music by One Jah featuring music of Maurice Nwokeji inspired by his childhood in Biafra.

This event is also supported by CritiQues ‘Home for Refugee Children’ initiative and HSSCF ‘Child Migrants Welcome’ initiative

The films on childmigrantstories.com were funded by the Centre for Public Engagement

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