Would Mark Dever Say Christians Can Vote for Democrats in Good Conscience?

Here is a quote from Mark Dever, who appeared on the podcast United? We Pray on February 20th 2019:

“If we were in Nazi Germany in the 1930’s I think you just have to be known for opposing the Nazis. I don’t think we’re there, and until we get there, I think it’s better for Christians to be able to disagree on political solutions and still trust each other’s sincere adherence to the gospel” (approximately minute 11:30).

Mark Dever sounds like a man trying to hold together a fracturing coalition.

Just five days after this podcast was released, the “Born-Alive Baby Bill” was blocked by Senate Democrats. Will this be the last straw for Mark Dever? Will he finally see what most Christians already see? That the Democratic Party is the explicit enemy of God?

I doubt it. Mr. Dever said nothing about the matter days later at the infamous ShepCon Q&A, March 6th (video unavailable).

Mark Dever’s position is not new.

He has been defending Democrat voters for a long time. Consider the following video from mid-2018. The section is a several minutes long. Jonathan Leeman gives a convoluted justification for it being morally acceptable to vote for Democrats, and Dever expresses agreement.

(The relevant section starts at 49:00.)

Where are these ideas coming from?

The answer should be obvious. Jonathan Leeman studied at the Fabian socialist London School of Economics.

The book that has shaped the thinking of these men is Divided by Faith by Emerson and Smith. It’s worth knowing what is in the book. Here is an excerpt from the book description on Amazon:

Through a nationwide telephone survey of 2,000 people and an additional 200 face-to-face interviews, Michael O. Emerson and Christian Smith probed the grassroots of white evangelical America. They found that despite recent efforts by the movement’s leaders to address the problem of racial discrimination, evangelicals themselves seem to be preserving America’s racial chasm. In fact, most white evangelicals see no systematic discrimination against blacks. But the authors contend that it is not active racism that prevents evangelicals from recognizing ongoing problems in American society. Instead, it is the evangelical movement’s emphasis on individualism, free will, and personal relationships that makes invisible the pervasive injustice that perpetuates racial inequality. Most racial problems, the subjects told the authors, can be solved by the repentance and conversion of the sinful individuals at fault.

Mark Dever has promoted Divided by Faith among his interns, and he speaks highly of the book. Please get to know the message of the book. It is one of the main playbooks of the leftists taking over throughout conservative evangelicalism.

But perhaps all of our concerns are unfounded.

Mark Dever can easily clear up the misunderstanding (if there is one) by putting out a statement that in fact it is necessary for Christians to be anti-Democrat, especially in light of the Democratic Party’s commitment to infanticide. Until he does this, all the evidence points to our conclusion:

Mark Dever believes Christians can vote for democrats in good conscience. In fact, he defends such “Christians.”

If Mr. Dever would like to issue a public statement to the contrary, we will happily issue a retraction.