Learn to suffer

A way to find peace.

Suffering, according to Buddha, is due to not being aware of the impermanence nature of life. But, what does this means?

I think the easiest way for me to explain it -this was how I kind of understand it- is to quote a George Harrison's song:

“All thing must pass… all things must pass away”

When we get attached to things or feelings [crave them], we believe that they will “last forever”. That particular feeling is the one way ticket to suffering. Happiness and suffering, are transient states of the mind. Meaning that they will come and go.

By Tomás Gauthier, The Frequency of Peace.

As I try to explain it on this sketch, life is based on the Principle of Polarity. Up and down, happiness and sadness, good or bad, Yin and Yang, etc.

Rest on this, is that the “Frequency of peace” becomes faster when you learn to let go one or other [accept them] without craving neither of them.


According to the teachings of Buddha, the eight steps to end up with the suffering are: [I think this eight steps can be applied to each and every situation in life. With this, I’m not saying they are easy to perform.]

1. Right Understanding
To understand the Law of Cause and Effect and the Four Noble Truths.

2. Right Attitude
Not harbouring thoughts of greed and anger.

3. Right Speech
Avoid lying, gossip, harsh speech and tale-telling.

4. Right Action
Not to destroy any life, not to steal or commit adultery.

5. Right Livelihood
Avoiding occupations that bring harm to oneself and others.

6. Right Effort
Earnestly doing one’s best in the right direction.

7. Right Mindfulness
Always being aware and attentive.

8. Right Concentration
To making the mind steady and calm in order to realize the true nature of things.


Learn to suffer is my way of saying; do not get attached to things or feelings. Live a simple, but purposeful, life and simply enjoy every step of the way… cause all things must pass.

If you want to learn more about Buddhism, I suggest you to visit this link.


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