Museums & #BlackLivesMatter

Adrianne Russell
Sep 20, 2015 · 8 min read
“Mike Brown Silent Protest White House” by Elvert Barnes, CC BY 2.0

Are Museums Really Ready to Respond to Ferguson?

In Bridget McKenzie’s Code:Words piece, “Toward the Sociocratic Museum”, McKenzie proposes a new model of museum to counter the existing plutocratic and bureaucratic archetypes that have arisen from plunder and oppression or are discomfitingly in bed with problematic corporate entities, respectively. In theory, the sociocratic museum would forego being participatory and engaging on its surface for “governance that is non-hierarchical, consent-based and rooted in its communities.” Recently, museums have championed inclusion and engagement. But the digital landscape and communities of color have pushed back, creating spaces that discuss their lived experience and critiquing how other people view it.

Claiming Their Space Digitally

“Eric Garner Protests” by Paul Silva, CC BY 2.0

Twitter: The Tool for Activists Online

“A Black Lives Matter protest of police brutality in the rotunda of the Mall of America in Bloomington, Minnesota” by Nicholas Upton, CC BY-SA 2.0

The Stutter-Step Between Hashtag to Action

“Eric Garner Protest 4th December 2014, Manhattan, NYC” by The All-Nite Images, CC BY-SA 2.0

CODE | WORDS: Technology and Theory in the Museum

An Experiment in Online Publishing and Discourse

Adrianne Russell

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Museum evangelist. Arts agitator. Literary artist.

CODE | WORDS: Technology and Theory in the Museum

An Experiment in Online Publishing and Discourse