Building a Raspberry Pi Audio Receiver

Remo Hoeppli
CodeX
Published in
8 min readApr 5, 2021

--

Photo by Teguh Baskoro on Unsplash

TL;DR

This post shows how to use a Raspberry Pi to build an audio receiver supporting Bluetooth streaming, AirPlay, Spotify Connect and, UPnP.

I recently wrote another article on this topic, since I wanted to see if meanwhile there might be another even better solution to building a Raspberry Pi audio receiver. My new article covers HifiBerryOS a dedicated project for this purpose, that, in my opinion, is much more advanced than the solution described in the article here. You can find the article here.

Upgrading your old HiFi system

So many of us still have this old HiFi system, that did cost a fortune back in the time but isn’t used so often anymore since we mostly stream music from Spotify, Soundcloud, Mixcloud, YouTube, and other streaming platforms. What if I told you there is an easy way to give your HiFi system an upgrade by reusing that Raspberry Pi which is getting dusty somewhere between your other tech gadgets.

Surely, one could also just buy a streaming device that supports all the technologies necessary. I already browsed for a well-suited device but didn’t buy it in the end, because of the high price or maybe also because I didn’t really know what technology to go for. Since the technology decision is nowadays a commitment to a certain manufacturer or streaming provider. Pretty much as it was years back with Tapes, Vinyl, CDs, or MiniDisc (right what the heck is MiniDisc =). Therefore, we lock ourselves into the ecosystem of a big company. Using a Raspberry Pi for this purpose can cheaper and also more future-proof. We can still use the Pi for something else if we don’t need it as a streaming device anymore.

Awesome sound quality

If you aren’t convinced that the Raspberry Pi is a good fit to stream high-quality music, you are partly right. While the hardware of the Pi is totally capable of handling the music transcoding, its line-out connector isn’t really top-notch. I would even say you can play music with it, but it does sound terrible. Fortunately, there is an easy solution to this problem, using a HiFiBerry hat. HiFiBerry is a manufacturer specialized in producing Audio extensions for the Raspberry Pi. I got myself a HiFiBerry DAC2 Pro which does…

--

--

Remo Hoeppli
CodeX
Writer for

I am a co-founder and software engineer at Earlybyte. Further, I’m a technology enthusiast and minimalism advocate, striving for simplicity and efficiency.