Logging and Monitoring for Home Labs

mr.smashy
CodeX
Published in
6 min readJul 3, 2023

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Visibility in your environment is usually a big gap

Portion of a Logwatch email

Why are Logging and Monitoring Important?

It depends on your home lab use case. If your home lab is strictly a lab environment, and doesn’t touch your production (i.e., the stuff you need to make your network run), then logging and monitoring isn’t that important. If your home lab runs production workloads, like DNS for example, or you have an app or service exposed to the internet, then it starts to become important. Security and intrusion detection, troubleshooting, performance optimization, capacity planning, and change management all become meaningful like they are in a real production environment.

But I’m Already Logging.

Most systems are already logging the things you need to pay attention to, or can provide the information with simple queries. But here lies the problem that every organization faces, from a one man shop to a fortune 500; what good are logs if nobody reads them? I install Rpi-Monitor on every server I build, which is a nice dashboard for overall server health. I can’t watch it all day. I have setup Prometheus to pull metrics and visualize them with Grafana, so I can get a bigger picture of overall health of all my systems, and dive deep into performance metrics, but again, I can’t watch it…

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mr.smashy
CodeX
Writer for

Cybersecurity architect. Security dev and researcher. Infosec nerd. Linux enthusiast. All opinions and views are my own. Polite, professional, prepared.