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What Does it Feel Like After 10,000 Hours of Coding?

Lessons you can learn after coding for a prolonged period of time

Photo by Aron Visuals on Unsplash

This is the seventeenth edition of CrunchX and here are the stories and resources we thought were worth spending the time.

1. Core i5 beats Core i7: Alder Lake-P creates problems for manufacturers and customers

In a surprising turn of events, one of Intel’s latest 12th gen i5 processors defies convention and performs better than its pricier i7 siblings. Benchmarks suggest that laptop hunting just got complicated. Written by Andreas Osthoff on Notebook Check and editorial selection by Antony Terence. Read the article here:

https://www.notebookcheck.net/Core-i5-beats-Core-i7-Alder-Lake-P-creates-problems-for-manufacturers-and-customers.621251.0.html

2. Framework’s new laptop means the promise of modular gadgets might be coming true

Framework’s update to its modular laptop affirms its commitment to upgradeable computers. Written by David Pierce on The Verge and editorial selection by Antony Terence. Read the article here:

https://www.theverge.com/23125965/framework-laptop-upgrade-intel-12th-gen

3. Reflections on 10,000 Hours of Programming

The title says it all, lessons after 10,000 hours of programming. Personally, I like the lesson about running your code, if you don’t know how software runs in each environment you don’t know your software. Written and published by Matt Rickard and editorial selection by Miloš Živković. Read the article here:

https://matt-rickard.com/reflections-on-10-000-hours-of-programming/

4. How to Find the Right Data Science Job?

People who have significant skills and knowledge in the field of Data are in high demand on the job market right now. In order to get a good job in that respective field, certifications and study programs from renowned schools often come in handy. Written and published on Tribune and editorial selection by Christianlauer. Read the article here:

https://www.tribuneindia.com/news/brand-connect/how-to-find-the-right-data-science-job-395685

5. 4 Techniques To Deal With Missing Data in Datasets

Incomplete data sets might create some problems for analysts since they cannot run their mathematical models or conduct correct analyses with gaps within the processed data sets. This article suggests four different techniques for how to deal with missing data in datasets with deleting the data and imputing averages being two of them. Written by OSCD Community on OSDC and editorial selection by Christianlauer. Read the article here:

https://opendatascience.com/4-techniques-to-deal-with-missing-data-in-datasets/

6. Artificial intelligence predicts patients’ race from their medical images

A study has shown that artificial intelligence is able to predict the race of a patient by just looking at their medical images by using data from Xrays or CT Scans. However, it is unknown how exactly AI is able to identify this since the medical images show no clue about the patients’ race. This article dives deeper into the specific study with its respective results. Written by Rachel Gordon on MIT News and editorial selection by Christianlauer. Read the article here:

https://news.mit.edu/2022/artificial-intelligence-predicts-patients-race-from-medical-images-0520

7. So Digital Billboard Ads Change With the Speed of Traffic Now

Companies such as Inrix supply digital billboards with their data, so that they can adjust their ads to the movement of the traffic on the streets. By doing so, they can specifically target their audiences with selected advertisements. Inrix, for instance, collects its data via various services such as Navi systems from different car brands or UPS maps. Written by Aarian Marshall on Wired and editorial selection by Christianlauer. Read the article here:

https://www.wired.com/2016/07/digital-billboard-ads-change-speed-traffic-now/

8. How To Become A 10x Engineer Using The Awk Command

I’m very much a fan of doing as little work as possible and very much not a fan of writing programs when a simple Linux shell script will do. To that end, I can highly recommend Robert Elder’s blog post where he goes through a simple-to-follow introduction of what can be done, quickly and simply, with the awk command. Knowing how to use the basic Linux tools is, at least in my book, mandatory for any progressive engineer! Written and published by Robert Elder and editorial selection by Dr. Stuart Woolley. Read the article here:

https://blog.robertelder.org/intro-to-awk-command/

9. How to Calculate Sqrt without Builtin Sqrt Method?

Machine learning engineer jdhao has some interesting ways of [calculating square roots], when you can’t use the sqrt() function (perhaps in interviews or often in cases like embedded code). I often see this asked during interviews too, so I thought I’d mention it as it’s both an interesting programming exercise and you don’t see Newton’s Method or Gradient Descent employed in this way very often! Written by jdhao on jdhao’s digital space and editorial selection by Dr. Stuart Woolley. Read the article here:

https://jdhao.github.io/2022/04/28/sqrt_without_using_builtin_sqrt/

10. How Addictive Internet Apps Tap Into Our Brains’ Reward Pathways

Doomscrolling across social media platforms with no destination in mind? Here’s how apps like Instagram and Twitter became an inseparable part of our lives. Written by Ruairi J Mackenzie on Technology Networks and editorial selection by Antony Terence. Read the article here:

https://www.technologynetworks.com/neuroscience/news/how-addictive-internet-apps-tap-into-our-brains-reward-pathways-361786

Closing Note

That’s our picks for this week. Hope you found something new, inspiring, astonishing, and crazy news going around the tech space. Thank you very much for taking your time to read this edition of CrunchX. Look out for the next edition the following week.

Regards,

CodeX Team

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