Unhappy Meals

Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.
Why? Because a health claim on a food product is a good indication that it’s not really food, and food is what you want to eat.
In the years following McGovern’s capitulation and the 1982 National Academy report, the food industry set about re-engineering thousands of popular food products to contain more of the nutrients that science and government had deemed the good ones and less of the bad, and by the late ’80s a golden era of food science was upon us.
In many cases, long familiarity between foods and their eaters leads to elaborate systems of communications up and down the food chain, so that a creature’s senses come to recognize foods as suitable by taste and smell and color, and our bodies learn what to do with these foods after they pass the test of the senses, producing in anticipation the chemicals necessary to break them down.
The industrialization of our food that we call the Western diet is systematically destroying traditional food cultures.
To take part in the intricate and endlessly interesting processes of providing for our sustenance is the surest way to escape the culture of fast food and the values implicit in it: that food should be cheap and easy; that food is fuel and not communion.

Source: Unhappy Meals


Originally published at Cogly.