Mingle with a Mule: Ally Wehrle `20

Sarah Warner

Ally Wehrle ‘20

For many students, sophomore year of college is seen as an oasis; a moment of calm before the storm of internships and “real-world” responsibilities associated with junior year. Maine native and resident second-year Mule Ally Wehrle `20 understands this very real pressure. However, while she admittedly struggles with the threat of her eventual upperclassman status, she also makes time to reflect on her experience at Colby so far and her hope for on-campus change.

“I’m terrified [of junior year] for sure,” Wehrle, an English and Education double major, said of her next year at Colby. “When you’re a sophomore, the future seems far enough away that the stress of it isn’t constantly pressing down — but junior year, you have to find a job, find an internship, know what you’re doing, and I don’t know any of it. It’s scary.”

Wehrle does have a few tips for managing this stress, though. She definitely recommends against getting over-involvement, instead suggesting that students pick a few things on campus to focus their attention on.

“Don’t be afraid to get involved, but don’t give in to the pressure to get too involved,” Wehrle said. “Here, whenever anyone introduces themselves, they’re always like ‘I’m involved in ten different clubs’ and I’m like ‘Oh my god!’ It’s just too much. So don’t spread yourself too thin, because sometimes it’s better to go in deep on a few things.

This philosophy of quality over quantity is one Wehrle applies to her own life. While she might not have a list of 20 clubs, she’s involved in to rattle off at a moment’s notice, she puts her heart into a few things — working in the library, serving as a tutor in the Farham Writer’s Center, and leading Colby’s branch of Amnesty International. Her job as a tutor, she explained. is one she claims is particularly fulfilling.

“I think definitely working with students on their writing is always a really fun thing to do on both sides of the experience [tutoring and getting tutored]. It’s really great seeing what people are doing in their classes and on campus.”

Wehrle is very passionate about the work she does with Amnesty International, a human rights organization. As one of the co-presidents of the club, she helps organize events and tables in the Spa, talking to Colby students about human rights abuse and letting them know what they can do to stop them. Recently, Wehrle has been focusing specifically on issues affecting the College’s very campus.

“I think that there’s definitely a lot that we as a school can work on. It would be great, I think, as a part of Amnesty, if we could figure out a way to address some of those issues. We just had an event about enacting change on campus in the Pugh Center, and I think it showed that it’s easy to discuss the problems on campus but it’s much harder to define the solutions — and further, to find solutions that seem like they can be tackled at a student level,” Wehrle said. “I think definitely just narrowing it down to a few things and then building it up from there is the only real way to start.” When Wehrle isn’t tutoring students or campaigning against human rights abuses, she can usually be found listening to Lorde or Vampire Weekend, or perhaps watching what she calls her “indulgent” show­America’s Next Top Model. She also enjoys reading poetry, especially work done by Gertrude Stein, who she was introduced to during her Modern American Poetry class.

“Gertrude Stein is really great. She’s doing some cools things with words and morphing them in weird ways that I really like, but I read her poetry for class mostly. I find it difficult to take the time to do things for enjoyment in terms of reading when you already have so much reading to do for classes,” Wehrle said. “It’s unfortunate.”

New reading habits aren’t the only thing Wehrle has struggled with at Colby, though. Her proximity to home as a native of mid coast Maine has been definitely less than ideal.

“[Being at Colby] feels kind of continuous from high school because a lot of the buildings look the same, and my little siblings come up for track meets in the winter so I see them a lot,” Wehrle explained. “That proximity is a little weird. Sometimes I feel kind of like it’s a bit too close, just a little bit.”

However, Wehrle explained that even through some of the harder experiences of her time at Colby, the little moments she shares with friends will keep her going throughout the years at the school.

“My favorite memories are the casual things. Just eating with friends, hanging out and talking. They’re not big things or events, but they’re the best part of being here.”

For many students, sophomore year of college is seen as an oasis; a moment of calm before the storm of internships and “real-world” responsibilities associated with junior year. Maine native and resident second-year Mule Ally Wehrle `20 understands this very real pressure. However, while she admittedly struggles with the threat of her eventual upperclassman status, she also makes time to reflect on her experience at Colby so far and her hope for on-campus change.

“I’m terrified [of junior year] for sure,” Wehrle, an English and Education double major, said of her next year at Colby. “When you’re a sophomore, the future seems far enough away that the stress of it isn’t constantly pressing down — but junior year, you have to find a job, find an internship, know what you’re doing, and I don’t know any of it. It’s scary.”

Wehrle does have a few tips for managing this stress, though. She definitely recommends against getting over-involvement, instead suggesting that students pick a few things on campus to focus their attention on.

“Don’t be afraid to get involved, but don’t give in to the pressure to get too involved,” Wehrle said. “Here, whenever anyone introduces themselves, they’re always like ‘I’m involved in ten different clubs’ and I’m like ‘Oh my god!’ It’s just too much. So don’t spread yourself too thin, because sometimes it’s better to go in deep on a few things.

This philosophy of quality over quantity is one Wehrle applies to her own life. While she might not have a list of 20 clubs, she’s involved in to rattle off at a moment’s notice, she puts her heart into a few things — working in the library, serving as a tutor in the Farham Writer’s Center, and leading Colby’s branch of Amnesty International. Her job as a tutor, she explained. is one she claims is particularly fulfilling.

“I think definitely working with students on their writing is always a really fun thing to do on both sides of the experience [tutoring and getting tutored]. It’s really great seeing what people are doing in their classes and on campus.”

Wehrle is very passionate about the work she does with Amnesty International, a human rights organization. As one of the co-presidents of the club, she helps organize events and tables in the Spa, talking to Colby students about human rights abuse and letting them know what they can do to stop them. Recently, Wehrle has been focusing specifically on issues affecting the College’s very campus.

“I think that there’s definitely a lot that we as a school can work on. It would be great, I think, as a part of Amnesty, if we could figure out a way to address some of those issues. We just had an event about enacting change on campus in the Pugh Center, and I think it showed that it’s easy to discuss the problems on campus but it’s much harder to define the solutions — and further, to find solutions that seem like they can be tackled at a student level,” Wehrle said. “I think definitely just narrowing it down to a few things and then building it up from there is the only real way to start.” When Wehrle isn’t tutoring students or campaigning against human rights abuses, she can usually be found listening to Lorde or Vampire Weekend, or perhaps watching what she calls her “indulgent” show­America’s Next Top Model. She also enjoys reading poetry, especially work done by Gertrude Stein, who she was introduced to during her Modern American Poetry class.

“Gertrude Stein is really great. She’s doing some cools things with words and morphing them in weird ways that I really like, but I read her poetry for class mostly. I find it difficult to take the time to do things for enjoyment in terms of reading when you already have so much reading to do for classes,” Wehrle said. “It’s unfortunate.”

New reading habits aren’t the only thing Wehrle has struggled with at Colby, though. Her proximity to home as a native of mid coast Maine has been definitely less than ideal.

“[Being at Colby] feels kind of continuous from high school because a lot of the buildings look the same, and my little siblings come up for track meets in the winter so I see them a lot,” Wehrle explained. “That proximity is a little weird. Sometimes I feel kind of like it’s a bit too close, just a little bit.”

However, Wehrle explained that even through some of the harder experiences of her time at Colby, the little moments she shares with friends will keep her going throughout the years at the school.

“My favorite memories are the casual things. Just eating with friends, hanging out and talking. They’re not big things or events, but they’re the best part of being here.”

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