Women’s Voices Theater Festival — Shout-Outs!

We’re extremely proud to be joining the 50+ professional theaters in D.C. presenting the Women’s Voices Theater Festival this fall by producing plays written by women and putting the spotlight on playwrights with two X chromosomes.

We’re excited to see as many of these plays (and celebrate as many of these playwrights) as we can — there are a few in particular that feature members of our extended Woolly fam, and we want to give some shout-outs! Hopefully you can join us for Women Laughing Alone with Salad, and also check out some of the other awesome shows below. Without further ado…

Bad Dog
by Jennifer Hoppe-House
Olney Theatre Center
September 30 — October 25

After ten years clean and sober, Molly Drexler falls off the wagon and drives her Prius through her living room wall. With a hole in the house as big as the hole in their hearts, Molly’s two sisters, mother, father, and wicked stepmother descend on the house for an “intervention” that doesn’t play out the way anyone thought it would. A sharp and poignant new comedy from one of Showtime’s hottest writers. Featuring Emily Townley (The Totalitarians, Maria/Stuart).


Destiny of Desire
by Karen Zacar
ías
Arena Stage
September 11 — October 18

On a stormy night in Bellarica, Mexico, two baby girls are born — one into a life of privilege and one into a life of poverty. But when the newborns are swapped by a former beauty queen with an insatiable lust for power, the stage is set for two outrageous misfortunes to grow into one remarkable destiny. “A writer of comedic skill” (Variety), Helen Hayes Award-winning playwright Karen Zacarías (The Book Club Play) infuses the Mexican telenovela genre with music, high drama and burning passion to make for a fast-paced modern comedy. Featuring Gabriela Fernandez-Coffey (Gruesome Playground Injuries, Stunning).


Uprising
by Gabrielle Fulton
MetroStage
September 17 — October 25

Set in the aftermath of John Brown’s Raid on Harper’s Ferry, Uprising explores self-determination and sacrifice through the lens of a free black community during Secession Era America. When Sal discovers Ossie, a hypnotic revolutionary hiding in the field, her life is turned upside down by her strong attraction to him and his revolutionary mission and its impact on her commitment to the well-being of her young son, Freddie. Inspired by the true story of Osborne Perry Anderson, the only African American participant in John Brown’s Raid to survive, and the tales of the playwright’s cotton-picking great-grandmother, Uprising explores notions of freedom and sacrifice, family and community. In the shadow of emotionally charged nationwide protests against police brutality and the racial divide that is still a part of our American culture, it is imperative that conversation around slavery and freedom continue to be a part of the American zeitgeist. Directed by Thomas W. Jones II (Cherokee).


Queens Girl in the World
by Caleen Sinnette Jennings
Theater J
September 16 — October 11

It’s summer 1962 on Erickson Street, Queens, New York. The sounds of doo-wop music fill the night, the scent of cream soda lingers in the air and 12-year-old Jacqueline Marie Butler is on the verge of adulthood. At the end of that summer, Jacqueline’s parents abruptly transfer her to a progressive, predominantly Jewish school in Greenwich Village. As one of only four black students, Jacqueline discovers a new city and a whole new world. This evocative one-woman show, starring Dawn Ursula, is a semi-autobiographical world premiere from Caleen Sinnette Jennings. Starring Dawn Ursula (Zombie: The American, The Convert).


Inheritance Canyon
by Liz Maestri
Taffety Punk Theatre Company
September 18 — October 10

The enigmatic Shell and two of her friends survive a deadly military experiment to find themselves trapped in a landscape where the rules of time, space and gravity are changing. By our friends and kindred souls Taffety Punk Theatre Company!


Learn more about the Women’s Voices Theater Festival here:

www.womensvoicestheaterfestival.org

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