Introducing Our First Brand Ambassador: Rosie Collins

Name: Rosie Collins

Date: 13 March 2017

Location: Ubud, Bali

We’re excited to introduce one of CoLo’s first Brand Ambassadors — Rosie Collins! Based in Ubud, Bali, Rosie is settling in just fine with a her massages and $4 meals. Based out of the coworking space Hubud, Rosie has already connected with a bunch a cool entrepreneurial friends.

Rosie’s passion lies in “making corporate social responsibility so banal that want me to stop talking about it!” And if she’s not busy shouting the praises of CSR, you’ll probably find Rosie taking photos of all the beautiful things Bali has to offer, working on her non-profit, working on her newest app or writing for her blog.

Bali is just the start for Rosie, who hopes to see all sorts of big places, including Canada, Mongolia, Nicaragua, parts of West Africa and even the Arctic Circle. “If I can find a coworking space in Northern Norway/Russia,” Rosie says, “I’ll be there for sure.”

We chatted to Rosie about her work, her thoughts on coworking in Bali, and what she was looking forward to next. Get to know more about Rosie in our interview below.

Keen on becoming a Brand Ambassador yourself? We’ve had an overwhelming amount of interest in our CoLo Brand Ambassador program, and have brought a few beta Brand Ambassadors on-board while we finalise a few things. If you’re keen to be a part of it, register your interest and apply here.

Tell us a little bit about yourself…

Hey! I’m Rosie, I’m twenty years old and currently working out of Ubud in Bali! I got here about a week ago after working in marketing for three years in New Zealand. I’m here now to start a non profit, photograph, blog, and see all sorts of big places after going on from Bali.

What does an average day in the life of Rosie look like?

It’s a mixed bag! I have about 7.3 days worth of commitments each week, so there’s always something that’s missing out in terms of attention. Some days I start with Metro Marketing, and work on our agency’s marketing, and then I’ll move onto working on Step Changers (the non profit), Billie (the app), The Rose Tinted (the blog) or I might study. Here at Ubud I’ve been getting up early, going for a scooter ride to find breakfast (the smoothie bowls are cliche but amazing), heading into Hubud, my coworking space here, and then stopping for lunch a couple of times in the day, because the food around here is worth it (and so so cheap).

After work I’ll scoot somewhere for dinner, go exploring, or see some of the nomads — it is really easy to hook into other groups of entrepreneurs because we’re all in the same boat. You can haggle together, work together, eat together, scoot together. I’m liking that a lot.

After dinner, I’m usually heading back to my hotel to finish up any project stuff and head to sleep. In saying that in the five days I’ve had here I’ve already had two balinese massages so I guess that’s becoming a typical evening routine too. Yoga is something else I’m keen to try — maybe tomorrow. The yoga studio is a two minute walk from work so I really have no excuse.

What’s your passion?

Making corporate social responsibility so banal they want me to stop talking about it! That and travel really. It’s something I’ve always wanted to be doing.

What countries do you really want to visit and why?

I’d like to get everywhere, but I really want to see Canada, Mongolia, Nicaragua and parts of West Africa. I think they’d all be cool and colourful spots to take photographs. One of my other bucket list items is to spend six weeks living out in the Arctic Circle. If I can find a coworking space in Northern Norway/Russia I’ll be there for sure.

What’s the best thing about being in Bali?

It’s like I’ve found my people — which makes me laugh really, but everyone seems so like-minded and onto it, it’s inspiring. I got into Hubud on Sunday and it was packed out with entrepreneurs solving issues to do with the Sustainable Development Goals — it was too cool.

Apart from that, also the crazy roading situation. I am no good at driving under New Zealand law so the ‘everyone just do you’ system is working well for me. They also have monkeys here — and everything food wise costs about $4–6. There are a lot of favourite things.

If you could bring one tradition back from Bali, and have it be a part of everyday life here, what would it be?

Hmmm — I’m not sure I’ve been here long enough to know! There is a day coming up that I’m looking forward to. Essentially everyone in the whole country stays inside and meditates for the whole day, and if you go outside there are people who will tell you off because you’re attracting the evil spirits. So you have to stay indoors the whole time. I am not sure about bringing a deep belief in evil spirits back- but it would be nice having people telling you to go back inside one day a year.