Conservation Needs More Social Scientists

By Diane Detoeuf | August 23, 2022

Making bread for Nouabalé-Ndoki National Park headquarters. Photo credit: ©Scott Ramsay.

[Note: See French language version of this essay below.]

When I arrived in the Republic of Congo in 2014, the person who hired me told me something she used to say to all new employees. One of her friends had a professor in 1978 who began his class like this, “Though this course is Wildlife Management 101, you need to take this to heart: wildlife are perfectly capable of managing themselves.”

I was quite surprised. Ever since I was a little girl, I have always wanted to “save wildlife.” I thought that the job of conservation NGOs was mainly to monitor and guard animals, to protect them from poachers.

It wasn’t until I arrived in the Brazzaville that I realized that biological research and ranger protection were just two parts of a much more complex process — one that, of course, involves working closely with the people who live with wildlife.

Farming around Makira Natural Park, Madagascar. Photo credit: ©FAO/Rijasolo.

In reality, wildlife management is about understanding people’s relationship with wildlife; their attitudes toward wildlife; the roles, both positive and negative, that wildlife play in their livelihoods and their cultural identity.

My job, at least in the job description, was to help our field programs measure the impact that WCS projects in Central Africa were having on the well-being of families and the ability of local communities to govern and manage their natural resources.

“We all recognize that social sciences are essential to understanding the role humans play in the use, management, and protection of natural resources.”

As soon as I met the teams, I realized two things. First, my academic background certainly prepared me to design, implement, and analyze the results of scientific research. But I still had a lot to understand about attitudes, human behavior, and socio-economics drivers. Second, all of my colleagues were enthusiastic, motivated, and intelligent, but very few of them had the skills or methods needed to undertake social sciences research.

So my mentor and I went in search of best practices, developed and tested in the field, to gather information on practical social science approaches in conservation. To our surprise, we didn’t find much. Most of the methods we found required post-doc level teams with unlimited time or budgets.

Farming in Northern Congo forest. Photo credit: ©Scott Ramsay.

Over the next few years, we worked with our colleagues and conservation-oriented social science scholars. The objective was to adapt, develop, field test, and revise different survey methods on family well-being, natural resource use, management and governance, and impact of protected areas for practical application in the field.

After 5 years, we have made progress in both hiring more social scientists and training WCS field teams with the knowledge and skills to implement a range of social science-based approaches to inform conservation.

“My colleagues were enthusiastic, motivated, and intelligent, but very few of them had the skills or methods needed to undertake social sciences research.”

During this time, other WCS regional programs expressed interest in what we were doing in Central Africa. We realized that there was a lack of capacity in other regions as well to consider ways of integrating social sciences into conservation. It only took a few conversations with partners to realize that WCS was certainly not alone in facing these challenges.

Getting water from WCS-funded borehole. Photo credit: ©Scott Ramsay.

All of the organizations and institutions we spoke with agreed that a common approach had to be found, and that the solution would not come from one organization alone. Within days, we collectively agreed to form a partnership whose goal would be to share what we knew and increase the capacity of field conservation practitioners in social sciences to inform the overall approach to conservation.

The Conservation Social Science Partnership (ConSoSci) was created by the Wildlife Conservation Society, The Conservation Commons of the Smithsonian Institute, The Nature Conservancy, and Conservation International, along with representatives from the US Fish and Wildlife Service, Fauna and Flora International, Oxford University, Bangor University, the Society for Conservation Biology Social Science Working Group, the Center for International Forestry Research, and the World Wildlife Fund.

“The objective was to adapt, develop, field test, and revise different survey methods for practical application in the field.”

We all know that nature and people are interconnected. More importantly, we recognize that social sciences are essential to understanding the role humans play in the use, management, and protection of natural resources.

Capturing livestock data for the Sustainable Wildlife Management Programme. Photo credit: ©FAO/Rijasolo.

ConSoSci is a global community of conservation advocates, social science practitioners, and researchers seeking to address critical gaps in social science capacity, implementation, and accessibility in the conservation field. We seek to integrate the social sciences more broadly into conservation decision-making and practice through the development of tools, technologies, training, and collaborations.

The partnership is new but has already made significant progress, with a YouTube channel offering video tutorials, a library of capacity building resources, and a library of field-tested social science surveys. By providing resources, training, and tools that are directly applicable in the field and vetted by expert researchers, ConSoSci hopes to move toward a more inclusive approach to integrating the social sciences into conservation practice.

That way, while wildlife are managing themselves, conservation practitioners are better positioned to understand the full suite of human interests, activities, and governance structures, how those intersect with the lives of wildlife, and what opportunities exist for improving both wildlife conservation and human well-being in the future.

Diane Detoeuf is a Social Science Technical Advisor at WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — —

French language version:

La conservation a besoin de plus de spécialistes en sciences sociales

Par Diane Detoeuf | 23 Août 2022

Faire du pain pour le siège du Parc National de Nouabalé-Ndoki. Crédit photo: ©Scott Ramsay.

J’ai été assez surprise. Depuis que je suis toute petite, j’ai toujours voulu “sauver la faune sauvage”. Je pensais que le travail des ONG de conservation consistait principalement à surveiller et à garder les animaux — à les protéger des braconniers.

Ce n’est qu’à mon arrivée à Brazzaville que j’ai réalisé que la recherche biologique et la protection par les rangers n’étaient que deux parties d’un processus beaucoup plus complexe, qui implique bien sûr de travailler en étroite collaboration avec les personnes qui vivent avec la faune.

En réalité, la gestion de la faune consiste à comprendre la relation des humains avec la faune, leurs attitudes à l’égard de la faune, les rôles, tant positifs que négatifs, que la faune joue dans leurs moyens de subsistance et leur identité culturelle.

Agriculture autour du parc naturel de Makira, Madagascar. Crédit photo: ©FAO/Rijasolo

Mon travail, du moins dans la description du poste, consistait à aider nos programmes de terrain à mesurer l’impact que les projets WCS en Afrique centrale avaient sur le bien-être des familles et la capacité des communautés locales à gouverner et à gérer leurs ressources naturelles.

Dès que j’ai rencontré les équipes, j’ai réalisé deux choses. Tout d’abord, ma formation universitaire m’a certainement préparé à concevoir, mettre en œuvre et analyser les résultats de la recherche scientifique. Mais j’avais encore beaucoup à comprendre sur les attitudes, le comportement humain et les facteurs socio-économiques. Deuxièmement, tous mes collègues étaient enthousiastes, motivés et intelligents, mais très peu d’entre eux possédaient les compétences ou les méthodes nécessaires pour entreprendre des recherches en sciences sociales.

“Nous reconnaissons tous que les sciences sociales sont essentielles pour comprendre le rôle que jouent les humains dans l’utilisation, la gestion et la protection des ressources naturelles.”

Ma mentore et moi sommes donc parties à la recherche des meilleures pratiques, développées et testées sur le terrain, afin de recueillir des informations sur les approches pratiques des sciences sociales en matière de conservation. À notre grande surprise, nous n’avons pas trouvé grand-chose. La plupart des méthodes que nous avons trouvées nécessitaient des équipes de niveau post-doc disposant d’un temps ou d’un budget illimité.

Agriculture dans la forêt du nord du Congo. Crédit photo: ©Scott Ramsay.

Au cours des années suivantes, nous avons travaillé avec nos collègues et des chercheurs en sciences sociales orientés vers la conservation. L’objectif était d’adapter, de développer, de tester sur le terrain et de réviser différentes méthodes d’enquête sur le bien-être des familles, l’utilisation, la gestion et la gouvernance des ressources naturelles, l’impact des zones protégées, pour une application pratique sur le terrain.

Après 5 ans, nous avons fait des progrès à la fois dans l’embauche de plus de chercheurs en sciences sociales, et dans la formation des équipes de terrain de WCS avec les connaissances et les compétences pour mettre en œuvre une gamme d’approches basées sur les sciences sociales pour informer la conservation.

“Mes collègues étaient enthousiastes, motivés et intelligents, mais très peu d’entre eux avaient les compétences ou les méthodes nécessaires pour entreprendre des recherches en sciences sociales.”

Pendant ce temps, d’autres programmes régionaux de WCS ont exprimé leur intérêt pour ce que nous faisions en Afrique centrale. Nous avons réalisé qu’il y avait un manque de capacité dans d’autres régions aussi, pour envisager des moyens d’intégrer les sciences sociales dans la conservation. Il a suffi de quelques conversations avec des partenaires pour se rendre compte que la WCS n’était certainement pas seule à faire face à ces défis.

Obtenir de l’eau à partir d’un forage financé par WCS. Crédit photo: ©Scott Ramsay.

Toutes les organisations et institutions avec lesquelles nous avons parlé ont convenu qu’il fallait trouver une approche commune et que la solution ne viendrait pas d’une seule organisation. En quelques jours, nous avons collectivement convenu de former un partenariat dont l’objectif serait de partager ce que nous savions et d’accroître la capacité des praticiens de la conservation sur le terrain en matière de sciences sociales afin d’éclairer l’approche globale de la conservation.

Le Conservation Social Science Partnership (ConSoSci) a été créé par la Wildlife Conservation Society, The Conservation Commons of the Smithsonian Institute, The Nature Conservancy et Conservation International, ainsi que par des représentants de l’US Fish and Wildlife Service, de Fauna and Flora International, de l’Université d’Oxford, de l’Université de Bangor, du Society for Conservation Biology Social Science Working Group, du Center for International Forestry Research et du World Wildlife Fund.

“L’objectif était d’adapter, de développer, de tester sur le terrain et de réviser différentes méthodes d’enquête pour une application pratique sur le terrain.”

Nous comprenons tous.tes que la nature et les humains sont interconnecté.es. Plus important encore, les sciences sociales sont essentielles pour comprendre le rôle que jouent les humains dans l’utilisation, la gestion et la protection des ressources naturelles.

Capture de données sur le bétail pour le programme de gestion durable de la faune. Crédit photo: ©FAO/Rijasolo

Le ConSoSci est une communauté mondiale de défenseurs de la conservation, de praticiens des sciences sociales et de chercheurs qui cherchent à combler les lacunes critiques en matière de capacité, de mise en œuvre et d’accessibilité des sciences sociales dans le domaine de la conservation. Nous cherchons à intégrer plus largement les sciences sociales dans la prise de décision et la pratique de la conservation par le développement d’outils, de technologies, de formations et de collaborations.

Le partenariat est récent mais a déjà fait des progrès significatifs, avec une chaîne YouTube proposant des tutoriels vidéo, une bibliothèque de ressources de renforcement des capacités et une bibliothèque d’enquêtes de sciences sociales testées sur le terrain. En fournissant des ressources, des formations et des outils directement applicables sur le terrain et validés par des chercheurs experts, le ConSoSci espère évoluer vers une approche plus inclusive de l’intégration des sciences sociales dans les pratiques de conservation.

Ainsi, pendant que les espèces sauvages se gèrent elles-mêmes, les praticiens de la conservation sont mieux placés pour comprendre l’ensemble des intérêts, des activités et des structures de gouvernance de l’homme, la manière dont ils s’entrecroisent avec la vie des espèces sauvages et les possibilités d’améliorer à l’avenir à la fois la conservation des espèces sauvages et le bien-être des êtres humains.

Diane Detoeuf est Conseillère technique en sciences sociales à WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society).

--

--

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Wildlife Conservation Society

Wildlife Conservation Society

5.9K Followers

WCS saves wildlife and wild places worldwide through science, conservation action, education, and inspiring people to value nature.