Concealed Carry In The Workplace And You

Moving Past Fear And Facing Facts

Workplace violence is a very real thing. You, as the employee, have a right to protect your life. According to the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), three occupations were the most prone to bearing the brunt of violence while on the job:

  • Sales (28%)
  • Protective services (17%)
  • Transportation (13%)

If you work in any of these fields, there’s roughly a one-in-five chance you will experience or witness violence happen in the workplace.

Workplace violence is not just limited to those industries. Healthcare and Social Services workers also bear an unfair brunt of nonfatal and fatal assaults. Those workers bore almost two thirds of all reported nonfatal injury and illnesses reported through the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

In 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Commissions’ National Electronic Injury Surveillance System collected data on over 137,000 non-fatal emergency room visits due to assault.

It is abundantly clear that no one is immune to the potential of being attacked while on the job.

While employers should continue to take steps to make the workplace safer, ultimately, a person’s own livelihood depends on having the ability to protect himself. Proper training and licensing for a concealed carry handgun is a terrific approach that makes sense for quite a few Americans.

Almost 6.1 million Americans are working two or more jobs to keep ends meet. For them, transitioning from one job to another is vital for a continued quality of life. For less than the cost of a week’s work, in most states, a person who is legally entitled to own a gun under federal law can purchase all the equipment and training necessary to carry a concealed handgun.

It’s all about understanding the cost-benefit of survival.

In the event we are assaulted in the workplace, we would all hope the police would quickly respond to save us. However, statistically, that’s just not the case. On average, it takes police at least five minutes to respond to a call — with the average response time running from 6 minutes to a half an hour.

When seconds matter, do you want to be at the mercy of your attacker for a half an hour?

Who takes care of your family if you are severely injured or killed on the job?

These are questions that each of us have a responsibility to answer for ourselves. And if that answer is you are unwilling to be a dutiful victim, then a concealed carry handgun and the appropriate training is one of the most logical solutions.

For those interested in finding out more about concealed carry in the workplace, check these following steps:

  • Take a concealed carry handgun course
  • Check your employee handbook
  • Talk to an attorney versed in your workplace’s state laws
  • Consult Human Resources if any questions arise
  • Once legally permitted, carry every day
  • Secure your weapon when not physically on your body
  • Use a holster that has high retention and fits with your work apparel

Your occupation may prohibit carrying a firearm. And if so, perhaps it’s time to talk to your Human Resources department. If you can’t carry concealed with the proper permitting, then they need to demonstrate the measures they are taking to protect your life to and from your workplace.

The most important part is that you pursue the proper process for obtaining your concealed carry handgun and license. This means investing in the proper holster to ensure the handgun is kept within your control at all times and being accountable for how you handle that firearm. Your safety in the workplace requires your participation. Staying safe and carrying concealed in the workplace is a fantastic way to take control of your livelihood.

Workplace violence is not just limited to those industries. Healthcare and Social Services workers also bear an unfair brunt of nonfatal and fatal assaults. Those workers bore almost two thirds of all reported nonfatal injury and illnesses reported through the Bureau of Labor Statistics Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses.

In 2009, the Consumer Product Safety Commissions’ National Electronic Injury Surveillance System collected data on over 137,000 non-fatal emergency room visits due to assault.

It is abundantly clear that no one is immune to the potential for hazard while on the job.

While employers should continue to take steps to make the workplace safer, ultimately, a person’s own livelihood depends on having the ability to protect himself. Proper training and licensing for a concealed carry handgun is a terrific approach that makes sense for quite a few Americans.

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