Concoda

Together, gold and cryptocurrencies will play a part in the new monetary paradigm, not out of choice, but out of necessity

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Photo by Alice Alinari on Unsplash

Looking back at history, it’s no surprise that today’s economic system produces a vast array of hardships, injustices, and inequalities. Century after century, dictators, bureaucrats, even convicted murderers, have commandeered the financial system, abolishing sound money principles to siphon off wealth for themselves. But no matter what empire, state, or nation the elites have come to rule over, each time, they lay the foundations for an inevitable collapse, corrupting the value of money, and destroying the currency they have bent to their will.

Right now in the 21st century, as the stock market climbs to all-time highs, as the Wall Street machine peddles the “stonks only go up” narrative, as the departing Trump camp celebrates DOW 30,000, the financial rot continues to build under the surface. We’re getting to the stage where we can’t ignore the impending “great reset” any longer, the great unwind we must face to purge deformities from the system. …


How America can avoid a hindsight-filled future

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Photo by The New York Public Library on Unsplash

How do we make informed decisions in modern-day society? How do we identify opportunities in an increasingly complex environment? What determines the success of our financial, social, and life choices? These are the most seductive questions we all want an answer to so that we can arm ourselves against an uncertain future.

We strive for an answer because the interconnectedness of the information age forces us to seek instant gratification and confirmation. We must know now, not a minute later. This urge inside ourselves to obtain information at an ever-increasing rate is a great tool to acquire vast amounts of knowledge in a short space of time. …


They will help us to see beyond an infinitely complex system

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Image by Stefan Keller from Pixabay

The early 1800s was the greatest period for critics of optimism. In Europe, Napoleon had been defeated, and the great monarchistic powers of Prussia, Russia, and Austria had formed the Holy Alliance, crushing the liberalist movements established in the previous century. While the older generations clung to hopeless optimism as a remedy, the rest of society knew democracy was about to experience its biggest test yet: The great Age of Reason was coming to an end.

It was up to the famed 19th-century pessimists to give Europeans strength during the resurgence of autocracy. These prominent figures not only changed mainstream perception but helped the people navigate tyranny, which eventually turned into democracy once again. Composers, Chopin, Schubert, and Beethoven produced their most solace-inducing work. Poets Heinrich Heine and Lord Byron expressed their disgust toward political authority. …


In the information age, these are the two elements you must combine to stand out

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Image by Icsilviu from Pixabay

Ever since economist Adam Smith published his magnum opus, the Wealth of Nations, back in 1776, humanity has experienced unrivaled prosperity. Empowering the invisible hand, the collective hivemind of markets to discover the value of goods and services has created a global population boom while poverty has reached all-time lows.

Over time, however, we’ve seen the gradual degradation, degeneration, and debasement of Smith’s free-market theory by authorities and high-profile figures. Their price controls create blackouts, their bailouts save bad ideas, and their printing presses destroy savings. We have seen disparities and dislocations emerge throughout society, the death of capitalism as Smith described, and the birth of crony capitalism. …


It’s been 300 years, still, the game hasn’t changed

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Credit: Westminster Abbey

Many consider Alexander Pope to be one of the greatest poets of all time. But he also happened to grow up in the early 1700s during the earliest period of financial speculation. The Dutch had floated the first stock market, and brokers — known in those days as “stockjobbers” — handled transactions of many popular historical figures such as Richard Cantillon and Isaac Newton.

It was exactly a century after the Tulip Bubble that Pope got to experience and document the South Sea Bubble, the first speculative mania in the history of stock markets. How it inflated was eerily similar to the modern-day manias we have become accustomed to. …


The award for best gaslighter goes to the central bankers

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Credit: Georgy Petaykin

Calling the top of the longest business cycle has become the ultimate widow maker trade of the 21st-century. It’s like every year offers an array of bizarre market-topping signals that prove to be false omens. In hindsight and comparison, predicting the last cycle peak was easy. All former Federal Reserve Chairman, Ben Bernanke, had to do was utter those famous words “subprime contained,” financial turmoil ensued, and the top was in.

This time, however, calling the top has become an impossible task. We’ve overcome every obstacle even passing the ultimate test of enduring Mother Nature. 2020 started with the Aussie bushfires, then we lost Kobe, then we had the obvious elephant in the room. Still, it's not over. …


This is what happens when you abandon sound money and pair it with desperation

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Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

It’s 8 pm. After a tough time at work, all you want to do is sit down, relax, and open YouTube. You bring up that video you've been dying to watch all day. But what’s this? Before you can dive in, 20-year-old guru Tristan interrupts you with an infomercial. It looks like he’s doing well for himself. He’s got the Maserati, the private jet, and the Russian model girlfriend — surely not hired for the day.

“Why on earth are you still working that 9-to-5 when you could be sitting in your Pyjamas, selling crap on autopilot?”, he says. While you have been arguing with your manager on endless Zoom calls, he’s been generating leads, he’s been making millions selling knockoff watches on Amazon, he’s had his trading bots scalping millions from the Forex markets. …


Many expect an imminent downfall. Here’s why that’s unlikely.

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Photo by Alicia Razuri on Unsplash

In August 2001, a week before 9/11 changed the world, Juan Zarate joined the Treasury Department as a senior advisor leading the U.S Treasury’s efforts to disrupt terrorist financing. Fittingly, his first task was to obstruct Al Qaeda’s money flow, preventing further attacks by targeting specific banks, couriers, wire transfers, and hawaladars that handled the terrorist group’s finances. Little did he know, however, that the U.S.’s reaction to 9/11 would not only fail to win the war on terror but would secure the foundations for a new era of U.S. financial supremacy.

Winston Churchill once said you must never let a good crisis go to waste, and that’s exactly what then-President Bush set in motion authorizing Executive Order 13224. Swiftly, via the Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), he gave Treasury officials the requisite powers to exile anyone who they considered a terrorist threat from the U.S. financial system. The U.S. failed to combat terrorism, but OFAC and Zarate succeeded in their mission. Employing Director Rick Newcomb’s veteran experience at the Treasury Department, he knew exactly how to impair Bin Laden’s financial network, disabling the flow of dirty money. …


COVID-19 has thrown out the stigma that popular culture creates

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Photo by Fábio Lucas on Unsplash

Ever since the pandemic struck, I have delved into subjects that I have never tasted before: philosophy, science, classical music, and art, not because I had a desire to explore them, but because I have genuinely run of out things to do during the ever-changing levels of lockdown that governments have enforced upon us.

Every passing week, it’s becoming increasingly hard to fill my day. I’ve met a couple of friends in bars, been on walks, played sports, but, ultimately, the awkwardness of these activities has left me scarred. I have lost the will, the urge, the energy to go outside. …


The race for space supremacy is back on, but it’ll be incredibly mediocre

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Credit: Adam Miller

In the past, we had high hopes of achieving new interstellar and interplanetary goals. But, let’s be frank, we got a tad overconfident. From then till now, we have accomplished very little compared to the moon landings, sending probes to orbit planets, and launching animals into outer space, other than false promises. We have Elon Musk’s vision of Mars colonization, a spaceship that lands on its backside, Star Wars box sets on-demand, plus an occasional release of space warfare propaganda to stimulate the mind.

But this absence of innovation, discovery, and progression is not confined to the cold, dark expanses of space. We’ve witnessed mediocrity to the highest degree here on Earth. We have given up our dreams of dashing through hyperspace, exploring new galaxies, and plunging into the same black hole as Matthew McConaughey. Instead, distracted by profit, we have become obsessed with cheap money, dropping interest rates to zero, letting the money printer go wild, enabling an excess of bad ideas to both survive and thrive. …

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Concoda

Digging deep inside these crazy markets

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