Mobility Panel Wrap Up — Or, It’s The Same Trend Everywhere

“The Future of Mobility” Source: myTaxi

What do an OEM, mobility Venture Capital firm and P2P car sharing platform think about the future of mobility? (Spoiler alert: they did not mention insurance even once.)

Below you will find the key take aways, in the form of direct quotes, from a discussion between Nairi Hourdajian, VP at Canaan, which is a venture capital firm investing in early-stage mobility concepts, Andre Haddad CEO of P2P car sharing platform Turo and Jörg Lamparter, Head of Mobility Services at Daimler.

“A few years ago I would have these dirty looks from OEMs when I’d be at a conference.” Andre Haddad, Turo

What will mobility look like in 10 years?

Nairi Hourdajia:

Mobility is going to be transformed by the concept of fractional ownership.We are still going to be a little ways out on ubiquitous self-driving at that point (…) but it’s going to look much more multi-modal. (…) there’s a fundamental awakening on how to get around.

Jörg Lamparter:

For us it’s clear that the future will be very different than the past and that means, clearly, mobility will be a shared mobility. (…) But we cannot stop working towards our existing customer base. We will do all in parallel (Editor’s Note: shared mobility, full and partial autonomous driving etc). (…) This is a challenge. Its a challenge for all OEMs.

Are we faced with the death of car ownership?

Andre Haddad:

Last year in the U.S. there were 3.2 trillion miles driven by personally owned vehicles. (…) This 3.2 trillion is going to decline and a lot of miles are going to be driven with shared cars, but it’s not going to go down to zero.( …) Cars are not just a utility — they are also something that people are very passionate about. (…) When you look at cars that are performing utility-type services, a lot of those are going to be replaced by shared cars, because it makes a lot more sense. But there is a very significant chunk of that 3.2 trillion that’s not just utility. It’s love, it’s passion. That’s trips. That’s memories. That’s family time. We are going to make that car ownership more affordable: you share your car when you don’t need it, but you can keep it for those special trips.
Nairi Hourdajian, VP at Canaan (Source: Canaan)

Where will we see things done notably better?

Nairi Hourdajia:

When you look at some of the most congested places in Asia (…) they’ve been thinking holistically about congestion reduction in a totally different way — by necessity. (…) You’re going to see pockets in Asia and Europe that are going to be very impactful.

Jörg Lamparter:

It’s pretty much the same trend everywhere. It’s the congested cities that are taking action now. This is not a regional topic, but it’s worldwide the same situation.
“Web Summit aka Where The Tech World Meets”

What’s Daimlers view on the new mobility competition?

Jörg Lamparter:

We are not fearing them at all. I guess this phase was there in the auto industry, but honestly, right now, we are well positioned and see it as a challenge. We invented the car and we will be a part of that whole change of mobility in the future. (…) We‘re collaborating on an ongoing basis with companies that are perceived as our competitors — but they are not. This is the big new thing that we need to learn as the auto industry: to collaborate on a very broad basis, many topics, and not just amongst OEMs, but OEMs and Tech companies.

Nairi Hourdajia:

If Tesla’s up and down year has shown us anything, it’s that manufacturing cars is really hard…even if you have excellent software. (…) The world in the future will be heavily reliant on the big OEMs, for a minimum for that expertise, and likely much more. But everyone will have to work together. If you listen to Elon Musk talk, its the manufacturing of the core automobile that’s really been the most challenging for him.

Andre Haddad:

A few years ago I would have these dirty looks from OEMs when I’d be at a conference. I think initially people thought: “oh, Peer-2-Peer car sharing, it’s the end of the car ownership. You’re the enemy.” But last year, the average host on Turo that is sharing his Mercedes is making $800/month in the U.S.; sharing it only 1/3rd of the time. A lot of people are now able to upgrade to a nice Mercedes because of their earnings on their platform. People are using Turo to get to a nicer car.

To see the full talk, check out the video below:


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