If You Had the Genetic Defect that Causes Alzheimer’s Disease, Would You Want to Know?

Or would you rather remain ignorant?

Roz Warren, Writing Coach
Crow’s Feet

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Photo by Wolfgang Hasselmann on Unsplash

A recent study found that people with two copies of a gene variant called APOE4 are almost certain to develop Alzheimer’s.

“Scientists knew that one copy of the gene elevated risk for the disease,” reports The Week Magazine, “but they now say a double copy should be considered a cause of Alzheimer’s, not just a risk factor.”

Unfortunately, the main treatment currently in use for Alzheimer’s cannot be used on patients with this genetic defect.

“My recommendation is if you don’t have symptoms, you should definitely not figure out your APOE status,” Stanford University neurologist Michael Greicius is quoted as saying. “It will only cause grief at this point.”

In other words, if it’s broke but you can’t fix it? Best not to know.

My Genetic Mutation

My mother died of breast cancer, far too young, at the age of 57, and so many of the women in my family have been diagnosed with breast cancer since then that my doc recommended that I get tested to see if I had a genetic defect. Sure enough, when the results came back, I learned that I have a CHEK2 mutation, which significantly…

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Roz Warren, Writing Coach
Crow’s Feet

Writing Coach and Editor Roz Warren (roSwarren@gmail.com) will help you improve and publish your work.