Why testing self-driving cars in SF is challenging but necessary

Kyle Vogt
Kyle Vogt
Oct 3, 2017 · 6 min read
A typical day in San Francisco, captured by one of our self-driving cars.
Instances of various maneuvers per 1,000 miles of autonomous driving. Source: Cruise internal metrics.
Population density of common self-driving test areas. Source: US Census Bureau 2010.
How our self-driving cars see the world. The predicted future path and multiple possible interactions of every person, car, and cyclist are calculated 10 times per second.
Traffic lights out at 6-way intersection. All driving completed autonomously.
Passing a box truck in Chinatown. All driving completed autonomously.
Humans controlling traffic near construction. All driving completed autonomously.
Cyclist cutting off a car at night. The driver took over, but post-analysis shows our vehicle was already braking and would have stopped in time to avoid a collision.
Unprotected left in traffic. All driving completed autonomously.

Cruise

Cruise builds the world’s most advanced network of self-driving vehicles to safely connect people with the places, things, and experiences they care about.

Kyle Vogt

Written by

Kyle Vogt

Co-Founder, President & CTO of Cruise

Cruise

Cruise

Cruise builds the world’s most advanced network of self-driving vehicles to safely connect people with the places, things, and experiences they care about.