10 Timeless Resilience Tips From Winnie the Pooh

More relevant than ever in 2021.

Karen Nimmo
Jan 21 · 3 min read
Image for post
Image for post
Image by OpenClipart-Vectors from Pixabay

innie the Pooh is about to turn 100.

When English author A.A. Milne created him for his son Christopher Robin in the 1920s, it’s unlikely he thought his bear “of very little brain” would be relevant a century on.

But he is. In a world of unrest and turmoil — and frequently Great Unkindness — Winnie the Pooh can still stop the heart with his wisdom.

As Covid rages on, as CNN spews out its political updates, he can still take us to the sanctuary of the 100 acre wood; he can still make us think about the importance of friendship, love, courage — and honey.

Here is the best of what he’s got.

10 Timeless Resilience Tips From Winnie the Pooh

1. Keep it simple.

“It is more fun to talk with someone who doesn’t use long, difficult words but rather short, easy words like, ‘What about lunch?’’ — Winnie the Pooh

Simple is best — in words, activities and life. If lunch is all you do in a day, that’s okay.

2. Be patient — everyone has “stuff” going on.

“If the person you are talking to doesn’t appear to be listening, be patient. It may simply be that he has a small piece of fluff in his ear.” Winnie the Pooh.

Everyone has their struggles. If people are busy, distracted, spinning in circles, and not giving you much attention, cut them some slack. At least until you know their story.

3. True friends are gold — value them.

“A day without a friend is like a pot without a single drop of honey left inside.”Winnie the Pooh

Be grateful for your friends. But also try to be that drop of honey for someone else.

4. Slow tf down.

“Rivers know this: There is no hurry. We shall get there some day.” — Winnie the Pooh

Take your time. There may be delays and detours. Persist. The fastest route is not always the best or smartest one. And rushing is terrible for your emotional health.

5. Keep an open mind.

“When you are a Bear of Very Little Brain, and you Think of Things, you find sometimes that a Thing which seemed very Thingish inside you is quite different when it gets out into the open and has other people looking at it.” — Winnie the Pooh

The way you see things may be (very) different from the way others do. Hear others’ views, even if you don’t agree with them. Being open-minded and adaptable is a hallmark of resilience.

6. Reach out.

“You can’t stay in your corner of the Forest waiting for others to come to you. You have to go to them sometimes.” — Winnie the Pooh

Get out of your house (and head)— even if it’s by Zoom. Be proactive in helping others — and in helping yourself. If you are struggling, find someone with whom you can be vulnerable and be honest with them. Don’t wait for them to come to you.

7. Think — and focus — before you act.

“Before beginning a Hunt, it is wise to ask someone what you are looking for before you begin looking for it.” Winnie the Pooh

Know your target — or at least the direction in which you want to travel. Unless you love walking around in circles.

8. Negative feelings are okay. So is swearing.

“Oh, bother.”Winnie the Pooh

Actually, Pooh is being a British-kind-of-polite. It’s okay to swear when you need to. Loudly.

9. Be kind to yourself.

“If possible, try to find a way to come downstairs that doesn’t involve going bump, bump, bump, on the back of your head.” — Winnie the Pooh

Be gentle with yourself. The world will bump you around, just as it does everyone. Don’t set yourself up for it.

10. Keep perspective.

“Could be worse. Not sure how, but it could be.” — Eeyore

The final word goes to Pooh’s friend and the 100 acre wood’s resident pessimist: Eyeore. And he has a point. It’s worth remembering that things could always be worse. And — somewhere for someone — they are.

Thanks for reading! Join my email list here if you’re interested in practical psychology for everyday life.

Curious

Find out what others have already figured out. Follow our publication to join our community.

Karen Nimmo

Written by

Clinical psychologist, writer. Editor of On the Couch: Practical psychology for everyday life. karen@onthecouch.co.nz

Curious

Curious

A community of people who are curious to find out what others have already figured out // Curious is a new personal growth publication by The Startup (https://medium.com/swlh).

Karen Nimmo

Written by

Clinical psychologist, writer. Editor of On the Couch: Practical psychology for everyday life. karen@onthecouch.co.nz

Curious

Curious

A community of people who are curious to find out what others have already figured out // Curious is a new personal growth publication by The Startup (https://medium.com/swlh).

Medium is an open platform where 170 million readers come to find insightful and dynamic thinking. Here, expert and undiscovered voices alike dive into the heart of any topic and bring new ideas to the surface. Learn more

Follow the writers, publications, and topics that matter to you, and you’ll see them on your homepage and in your inbox. Explore

If you have a story to tell, knowledge to share, or a perspective to offer — welcome home. It’s easy and free to post your thinking on any topic. Write on Medium

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store