Damian Radcliffe
Aug 12 · 7 min read

This past academic year, just under 4,000 University of Oregon students (3,971) heard from nine amazing guest lecturers, as part of the Demystifying Media speaker series that I run at UO’s School of Journalism and Communication.

I’ll be posting links to their lectures in due course. But in the meantime, here’s links to the podcast interviews which accompanied their visits to campus.

The great thing about curating a series like this is the amazing people — from across academia and the media industries — that I get to meet, talk to and hear from.

This year that meant:

I also partnered with colleagues hosting other events to produce podcasts interviewing Richard Gingras (Google), as well as Matt Sepic and Laura Yuen (Minnesota Public Radio).

11 great topics discussed

Links to each podcast — and a short summary/bio of my guest(s) are below:

  1. Why The Future of Journalism is Collaborative
  2. Changing the Way We See Native America
  3. Business Journalism and Immersive Media
  4. The evolution of journalism
  5. How the music business is a petri dish for journalism innovation
  6. How Climate Change Can Be Part Of Any Beat
  7. Understanding power and privilege
  8. How news organizations can fight misinformation
  9. Knowing and checking your data

Bonus podcasts

10. Google and Journalism

11. The ethics of reporting on your own newsroom


1. Why The Future of Journalism is Collaborative

Heather Bryant is the founder and director of Project Facet, an open source infrastructure project that supports newsroom collaboration with tools to manage the logistics of creating, editing and distributing collaborative content, managing projects, facilitating collaborative relationships and sharing the best practices of collaborative journalism.

As a 2016–2017 John S. Knight Journalism Fellow at Stanford, she researched how to make collaboration easier and more effective for newsrooms.

This year, she published the Collaborative Journalism Workbook and works with the Center for Cooperative Media to chronicle collaborative projects from around the world in the Collaborative Journalism Database. Her work includes managing the Collaborative Journalism Slack and doing trainings and workshops on effective, meaningful editorial collaboration.

2. Changing the Way We See Native America

Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Tulalip) is one of the nation’s leading photographers, based in the Pacific Northwest. She earned her BFA from Brooks Institute of Photography where she double majored in Advertising and Digital Imaging.

Her most recent endeavor, Project 562 (www.project562.com), has brought Matika to over 300 tribal nations dispersed throughout 40 U.S. states where she has taken thousands of portraits, and collected hundreds of contemporary narratives from the breadth of Indian Country all in the pursuit of one goal: To Change The Way We See Native America.

In this podcast Matika, is also joined by the award-winning photographer and University of Oregon Professor Torsten Kjellestrand, and School of Journalism and Communication student Mitchell Lira. Together we discuss issues of representation, how J-Schools and educational institutions can support native students, and how to build an indigenous Wakanda.

3. Business Journalism and Immersive Media

Tech Trends Editor Alice Bonasio joins us to talk with her about her path from tech journalist to entrepreneur.

Alice Bonasio is Editor-in-Chief for Tech Trends, a website “showcasing the latest disruptive technology that is changing the world we live, work, and play in.”

Alongside her work at Tech Trends, Alice is also a VR (Virtual Reality) and Immersive Media consultant, and a contributor to publications such as Wired, Forbes, Fast Company, Quartz, VR Scout, Playboy, Scientific American, Ars Technica, The Next Web, and others.

4. The evolution of journalism

In this podcast we’re joined by NPR National Desk reporter Tom Bowman and Brigid Schulte, director of the Better Life Lab at New America, for an engaging discussion about the current state of journalism.

Bowman’s previous reporting at The Baltimore Sun on racial and gender discrimination at the National Security Administration led to a Pentagon investigation in 1994.

Before joining New America, a non-partisan think thank, Schulte was an award-winning staff writer for The Washington Post, where she served for almost two decades. Schulte is also the acclaimed author of the New York Times best-selling book on time-management and time pressure, Overwhelmed: Work, Love & Play when No One has the Time.

5. How the music business is a petri dish for journalism innovation

In this episode we are joined by Cherie Hu, an award-winning freelance journalist whose work focuses on the intersection of music, media and technology.

In addition to her conference speaking engagements and regular appearances as an expert commentator on CNBC and CGTN America, Hu’s bylines can be seen in publications such as Billboard, Forbes, Variety, the Columbia Journalism Review — and many more.

6. How Climate Change Can Be Part Of Any Beat

Rosalind Donald isa PhD candidate in communications at Columbia University researching community understanding of climate change in Miami.

Her work focuses on the way the city’s politics, infrastructure and environment influence how climate change is interpreted in policy and the popular imagination.

Also joining us in the studio are Hollie Smith, Assistant Professor of Science and Environmental Communication at the University of Oregon’s
Media Center for Science and Technology, and Destiny J. Alvarez, a graduate student at our School of Journalism and Communication.

7. Understanding power and privilege

Dr. Sue Robinson (University of Wisconsin-Madison), joined the faculty at UW-Madison’s School of Journalism and Mass Communication in January 2007 and now holds the Helen Firstbrook Franklin Professor of Journalism research chair. As a scholar, she explores how journalists and news organizations adopt new information communication technologies to report on public affairs in new forms and formats as well as how audiences and individuals can use the technologies for civic engagement.

Her book, Networked News, Racial Divides: How Power & Privilege Shape Progressive Communities, researches how digital platforms enable and constrain citizens — especially those in marginalized communities — who produce and share information in the public sphere about racial achievement disparities in the K-12 education system.

The book is meant to be a guide for journalists, politicians, activists and others on how to navigate information networks to improve public deliberation.

8. How news organizations can fight misinformation

In this episode I interviewed Mandy Jenkins (then a JSK Fellow at Stanford, now GM for @CompassLocal, @McClatchy). Prior to her Stanford fellowship, Mandy was the first editor-in-chief at Storyful, the leading social news and insights agency. There she managed a team of 60+ social journalists who worked with the world’s top newsrooms in surfacing, verifying and acquiring eyewitness journalism and debunking disinformation.

Before Storyful, her roles include being the managing editor of the Project Thunderdome newsroom for Digital First Media, as well as coordinating the Off the Bus citizen journalism program as a social news editor for politics at The Huffington Post, and working as social media editor for TBD, a Washington, D.C.-area local news startup.

Mandy is also President of the Online News Association and sits on the board of directors for the American Society of News Editors.

9. Knowing and checking your data

Joining us for this podcast is Jennifer LaFleur, data editor for The Investigative Reporting Workshop and an instructor of data journalism at American University.

Previously, LaFleur was a senior editor at Reveal from The Center for Investigative Reporting, managing data journalists, investigative reporters and fellows. She also contributed to or edited dozens of major projects while at Reveal, one of which was a 2018 Pulitzer Prize finalist.

Also in the room is Brent Walth, an Assistant Professor at the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication. A Pulitzer finalist in 200 and a winner in 2001, Brent’s experience includes working as staff writer, correspondent, senior investigative report, and managing editor for major publications in Oregon.

He is a five-time winner of the Bruce Baer Award, Oregon’s top reporting prize, and the Gerald Loeb Award, the nation’s top honor for business and financial reporting.

Bonus Podcasts

10. Google and Journalism

In this special edition, we are joined by Richard Gingras, Vice President of News at Google. He and I discuss Google’s role in supporting journalism, how the internet has disrupted the business model, and what skills young journalists need to develop.

Gingras’ interview was part of a wider visit to the University of Oregon in February 2019, which included delivering the annual Ruhl Lecture: https://journalism.uoregon.edu/about/events/ruhl-lecture

11. The ethics of reporting on your own newsroom

Each year, the University of Oregon School of Journalism and Communication recognizes the tough, ethical decisions made in the newsroom and in the field — decisions that make a difference in the community but are often invisible to the public. The Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism presents a $10,000 annual prize to a media organization or journalist who reports with integrity despite personal, political, or economic pressure in honor of Seattle broadcasting legend, Ancil Payne.

Joining me for this episode of the Demystifying Podcast are Minnesota Public Radio correspondents Matt Sepic and Laura Yuen, who were part of the investigative team that was named this year’s Ancil Payne Award winner.

During their interview, Yuen and Sepic discuss what it was like to report on their newsroom’s coverage of the fall from grace of one of its network’s biggest stars — Garrison Keillor, producer and host of “A Prairie Home Companion” — after he was accused of inappropriate behavior at the height of the #MeToo movement.

Find out more: https://demystifying.uoregon.edu/

Subscribe to this podcast series via iTunes, SoundCloud and Spotify.

Damian Radcliffe

Research, analysis, teaching materials and journalistic output by the Carolyn S. Chambers Professor of Journalism at the University of Oregon

Damian Radcliffe

Written by

Chambers Professor in Journalism @uoregon | Fellow @TowCenter @CardiffJomec @theRSAorg | Write @wnip @ZDNet | Host Demystifying Media podcast https://itunes.app

Damian Radcliffe

Research, analysis, teaching materials and journalistic output by the Carolyn S. Chambers Professor of Journalism at the University of Oregon

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