Stop Imitating The Habits Of Successful People: It’s Killing You

Darius Foroux
Jan 16, 2017 · 4 min read

“Notice how we all assume that when you say “become successful” you really mean “get rich”.”

I don’t think there’s anything wrong with getting rich. People can pursue anything they want.

“There’s a difference between studying success and actually building a business or career that matters. It’s the same as talent and hard work. I know a lot of talented people who never contributed anything to the world.

And I also know a lot of people without talent who did wonderful things in life. Knowing how to be successful will not guarantee success. I believe it’s the opposite. People who don’t assume they know everything often accomplish the most.”

I think that was such a great point he made. I must be honest. I’ve also tried to “study the habits of successful people” in the past. But I’ve never looked at it that way.

Correlation doesn’t mean causation.

That’s the exact phrase he used. Reading articles and books that talk about success is a waste of time because they are not teaching you anything useful.

There’s beauty in the struggle.

If you blindly try to imitate others, you kill your character. Ralph Waldo Emerson put it best:

“Envy is ignorance, imitation is suicide.”

Be yourself. It’s the biggest cliché in the book of an amateur philosopher. “Imitation is death” sounds better than the lame old “just be yourself.” And it means the same.

“There’s beauty in the struggle. Ugliness in the success.”

Think about it. What if you get to a destination to find out that you arrived at the wrong place?


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The Blog Of Darius Foroux

Articles on productivity, habits, decision making, and personal finance.

Darius Foroux

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I write about productivity, habits, decision making, and personal finance. My book, The Road To Better Habits, is now free http://dariusforoux.com/better-habits

The Blog Of Darius Foroux

Articles on productivity, habits, decision making, and personal finance.