Why do we love data-driven badges?

Or how I painted Easter Eggs for the Data Visualization Society

Weather portraits by Nicholas Rougeux, part of his series of visual experiments that straddle the line between traditional small multiples and data-driven badges.
Badges (left) made for movies by Shirley Wu and (right) for TED talk participants by Giorgia Lupi
(left) physical data-driven badges and (right) 3D data-driven badges, both of female nobel prize winners and both by Shirley Wu.
Tanveer Jeddy’s data visualization of Stephen Curry’s ratings of popcorn at NBA arenas.

But should we?

People love data-driven badges but are they really useful? Well, they’re never going to win against traditional small multiples approaches when it comes to precision and accuracy. They’re not good for trends or clustering. They likely aren’t going to be the best at encoding topologies or hierarchies or geographic data, either.

Legends for badges described above including Giorgia Lupi (left), Amy Cesal (middle top) and Shirley Wu (middle bottom and right)

Data Visualization Society

The publication for the Data Visualization Society, an initiative to foster community for data visualization professionals of all backgrounds.

Elijah Meeks

Written by

Senior Data Visualization Engineer at Netflix. Created Semiotic. Wrote D3.js in Action. #d3js

Data Visualization Society

The publication for the Data Visualization Society, an initiative to foster community for data visualization professionals of all backgrounds.