Congress Confronts Content Abuse as the Healthcare Care Industry Struggles To Suture Its Own Data Wounds

From national-level data leaks to the return of a deadly botnet, it’s been a busy week across the fraud landscape. This Week in Fraud News, September 20, 2019.

Image for post
Image for post

It’s a tough week in fraud news when data breaches go national, but that’s exactly what happened this week. Per news from ZDNet, a recent leak of data impacted … well, all of Ecuador, essentially:

Regrettably, that wasn’t the only big number to hit the fraud news wires this week. From The Next Web we learned of more unsecured data, this time emerging from the healthcare arena:

News stories of the type shared above beg the question, what can be done? It’s an important question to ask, but the answers are troubling, what what’s supposed to be the answer, proves instead to be another problem! In other words, we got news this week of a supposed solution actually causing problems of the sort it was meant to solve:

From the user perspective, this kind of news can be pretty maddening. Here you are, trying to do the right thing, and your chosen solutions — which you rightly believed were trustworthy — are failing you.

Well, just when you might have given up on technology ever doing anything to protect you, along comes a fascinating story from MIT Technology Review, about deepfakes that are on your side:

The MIT team is absolutely correct in noting the increasing prevalence of “persuasive misinformation” online, and tech giants like Facebook and Google have been at the center of deepfake — and other — controversies for quite some time now. One of the most serious concerns has been the issue of Content Abuse; specifically, content that is toxic, abusive, threatening, and dangerous. This week, we learned from the Washington Post that Congress is trying to do something about the problem:

Content Abuse takes on many forms, from the hate speech detailed in the Washington Post article, to “everyday” spam, scams, fake reviews, promo abuse, and more. It’s important to remember though, that while those latter examples may seem comparatively ordinary (and by inference, less harmful), this kind of “everyday” content abuse costs businesses a great deal. From Ars Technica this week, we got a highly informative article about how a famously destructive botnet works to threaten its targets:

It’s a complicated world out there, but if there’s one thing you can count on, it’s that we’re here to help you make sense of the latest fraud news. See you next week!

DataVisor

AI-powered protection from online fraud, digital risks, and sophisticated attacks.

Christopher Watkins

Written by

I type on a MacBook by day, and an Underwood by night. I carry a Moleskine everywhere.

DataVisor

DataVisor

AI-powered fraud management solutions that move faster than the speed of fraud.

Christopher Watkins

Written by

I type on a MacBook by day, and an Underwood by night. I carry a Moleskine everywhere.

DataVisor

DataVisor

AI-powered fraud management solutions that move faster than the speed of fraud.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch

Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore

Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store