Orchestrating micro-frontends

luca mezzalira
Apr 12 · 11 min read
How can we orchestrate our micro-frontends architecture?

Server-side or edge-side orchestrator

A server-side or edge-side orchestrator would mean that for any deep-link or organic traffic hitting our domain has to be analysed by an application server or an edge solution (lambda@edge for instance), in both cases we need to maintain a map of URLs that correspond to static HTML files (aka micro-frontends).
For instance, if a user logs out from our application we should probably unload the authenticated micro-frontend and load the sign in/sign up micro-frontend, therefore the application server or the code running on the edge should know which HTML file to serve for every URL or group of URLs in the case we are going to work with SPAs.
This technique could work without any problem considering we can change quickly the micro-frontends map directly on the server without any impact on the client-side, but presents some potential challenges, like finding the best way to share data across micro-frontends considering there are some limits of storage inside the browser and doing too many roundtrips to the servers is not ideal in particular for slow connections.
Another challenge would be finding a solution for initialising the application, considering with micro-frontends we split the monolith into multiple subdomains, are we going to initialise the application every time a new micro-frontend is loaded? Are we going to use Server Side Rendering storing the configuration inside the HTML? How do we communicate between micro-frontends? How do we scale our application servers when there is bursty traffic?
Those are some of the challenges for implementing a server-side or edge-side orchestrator.

Client-side orchestrator

Another possible approach could be create a client-side orchestrator responsible for:

In DAZN we opted for a client-side orchestrator that we called bootstrap.

Bootstrap has all the responsibilities listed above plus an additional one related to our use case, in fact, bootstrap is abstracting the I/O APIs of the platform where the application is running on, in this way each micro-frontend is completed unaware in which platform is loaded.
With this technique, we can re-use a micro-frontend across multiple smart TVs, consoles or set-top boxes without the need to rewrite specific device’s implementations, unless the implementation has memory leaks or performance issues.
Bootstrap is served every time a user types our domain in the browser or opens the application on a smart TV, it’s always present and never unloaded for the entire duration of the user session.

DAZN loading flow

Initialise the application

Bootstrap should be responsible to set the application context, first of all understanding if the user is authenticated or not and based on the application initialisation we can load the correct micro-frontend.
Any other meaningful information your application needs for setting the context for the entire application should be managed at this stage.
It could be a static configuration (JSON) or dynamic one where an API needs to be consumed, either way, having an external configuration for our frontend allow us to change some behaviours of our system without the need of bootstrap releases.
For instance, a configuration could provide valuable information for the application lifecycle like features toggles, localised labels for the user interface and so on.

Micro-frontends routing

Bootstrap is definitely responsible for routing between micro-frontends, in our implementation, we have 2 routing spread between bootstrap and every micro-frontend.
Bootstrap doesn’t have the entire URLs map of our applications, instead, it loads in memory a map of which micro-frontend should be loaded based on the user status and the URL requested via user’s interactions or deep link.
Those two dimensions allow us to load the correct micro-frontend and leave to the micro-frontend code handling the URLs to manage inside different views that compose it.
A rule of thumb here is to assign a specific second level path for a micro-frontend so it would be easier to address the scope of a micro-frontend, for instance, the authentication micro-frontend should be loaded when the user types mydomain.com/account/*, instead, the micro-frontend for the help pages should be loaded when the user clicks on a link like mydomain.com/support/* and so on.
Inside every single micro-frontend, we can then decide to have additional paths like mydomain.com/support/help-page-A or mydomain.com/support/help-page-B, in this way the domain knowledge would be retained inside the micro-frontend without spreading it across multiple parts of the application.

Micro-frontends lifecycle

As we mentioned before, each micro-frontends should be loaded via the boostrap, but how?
Single-spa, for instance, uses a javascript file as an entry point for mounting a new micro-frontend.
In DAZN, we took a different approach because using just a javascript file for loading a micro-fronted would have precluded the possibility to use server-side rendering at compile time that was an interesting option for us to provide faster feedback to our user meanwhile they were transitioning from a micro-frontend to another one.

Micro-frontend anatomy: HTML, JavaScript and CSS files
A slow-motion video for showing how bootstrap loads inside itself the nodes from a micro-frontend

Bootstrap memory and dependencies management

It’s time to deep dive into the micro-frontends memory management, considering bootstrap is loading one micro-frontend per time, as explained in the previous post, and each micro-frontend is not sharing any library or dependency with another micro-frontend, we could end up in a situation where a micro-frontend is loading React v.15 and the next one React v.16.
At the same time, we want to have the freedom to pick any technology and library version inside every micro-frontend because the development team that retain the business and technical knowledge should make the best implementation choice available instead of having constant trade-offs across the entire application as usually happens when we work with a Single Page Application.

APIs layer for communicating between bootstrap and a micro-frontend

The last bit worth mentioning is the APIs layer exposed by the bootstrap via the window object.
If you asked yourself how we share data and communicate between micro-frontends, bootstrap is the answer!

Summary

During this post, we have explored the possibilities for orchestrating micro-frontends, we deep dive into the client-side orchestrator that in DAZN is called bootstrap, in particular, we have seen the benefits and the challenges of this approach and how we have managed to solve them.
In particular, we saw the bootstrap has 3 main responsibilities:

DAZN Engineering

Revolutionising the sport industry

luca mezzalira

Written by

VP of Architecture at DAZN, Google Developer Expert and London JavaScript Community Manager, Author of Front-End Reactive Architectures: https://goo.gl/ywAmsx

DAZN Engineering

Revolutionising the sport industry