Catholic Sanctimony and the Alleged Naturalness of Moral law

The Catholic Catechism’s lame attempt to assimilate ancient Greco-Roman philosophy

Benjamin Cain
Deconstructing Christianity

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Photo by MART PRODUCTION, on Pexels

What’s behind the smugness and sanctimony of many Catholic priests, theologians, and apologists?

Mind you, far from conceding that he or she tends to be imperious when condemning the secular world, any of those Catholic authorities would profess to be humble in faith. Simultaneously, though, he or she would maintain that Catholicism is the one true religion, so God happens to be solely on that religion’s side.

Yet what if you investigated the Catholic Catechism and found a dogma that’s both appalling in its obsolescence, and insolent in how it drives this religion’s more obnoxious conservative policies?

Then you’d have the worst of both worlds, the sanctimony plus the lack of anything worthy to back it up. After all, some geniuses might earn their arrogance because of their intellectual superiority. If the basis of Catholic morality, say, were obsolete, however, the religious sanctimony would be so much effrontery, or the icky stuff of a massive fraud.

The early history of natural moral law theory

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Benjamin Cain
Deconstructing Christianity

Ph.D. in philosophy / Knowledge condemns. Art redeems. / https://ko-fi.com/benjamincain / benjamincain8@gmailDOTcom