Earth as a blue marble rolling around in space, made possible with unique observations by DSCOVR EPIC.

Extraordinary Views of Earth from a Frankly Wacky Satellite

Descartes Labs
Jun 5 · 5 min read
DSCOVR sits in the L1 Lagrange Point, a location where the gravitational forces of the earth and sun have near-equal pull on the satellite, allowing it to sit relatively still to make its observations | Source: NASA
DSCOVR collects an image of one side of the planet every 1–2 hours. When we combine these images into animations we can clearly see the rotation of the earth. Here is the solar eclipse on August 17th, 2017.
About two months of DSCOVR EPIC satellite imagery in Geostationary and Plate Carrée projections. The stutters are caused by changes in collection frequency. The flashes of color are caused by occasional missing data.
About a month of DSCOVR EPIC satellite imagery in the Interrupted Goode Homolosine Projection.
DSCOVR EPIC data collected from the L1 Lagrange point and in the Lagrange projection!
About a month of DSCOVR EPIC satellite imagery in the Azimuthal Equidistant projection.
One day of RGB DSCOVR Epic imagery projected onto cubes and animated. A compromise between flat earthers and scientific fact.
Seasonal shrinking of the ozone hole over the Antarctic. The ozone hole expands and contracts with changing temperatures.

Missing data makes the earth look like it’s raving.
Earth as a spinning top in the Bonne projection.
A day of earth in a circus mirror, or the Perspective Conic projection.
A bumpy ride from an odd perspective. This is the native view from the DSCOVR EPIC sensor.

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Descartes Labs is building a data refinery for satellite imagery.

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