CSS selectors cheatsheet & details

📜 CSS selectors cheatsheet

Recently, I’ve been diving into CSS selectors.

There are so many CSS selectors with unfamiliar symbols, > . , * + ~ [ ] etc, so I was often confused about how CSS selectors work. Eventually, I straightened them out in my head and re-designed them how I understand.

* In fact, I would have wanted to organize them on a single A4 sized page to save papers and save the Earth but I couldn't, because there are so many selectors I wanted to add so I had to go over more than one page. It is all four A4 pages, except the cover pages.

Print this cheatsheet out and stick it on the wall. Don’t memorise them, just peeping. I hope this infographic helps you find proper CSS selectors quickly and saves your time.

CSS selectors cheatsheet
CSS selectors game by Ryan Yu

🔮 Go to download the CSS selectors cheatsheet and enjoy the game🕹

No worries. It’s all free.

🔎 Dive into CSS selector.

I will list the infographic along with MDN definitions to make things easier for you.


Type Selector

The CSS type selector matches elements by node name. In other words, it selects all elements of the given type within a document. - MDN


ID Selector

Selects an element based on the value of its id attribute. There should be only one element with a given ID in a document. - MDN


Descendant Selector

Any element matching B that is a descendant of an element matching A (that is, a child, or a child of a child, etc.). the combinator is one or more spaces or dual greater than signs. - MDN


Combine the Descendant & ID Selectors


Class Selector

The CSS class selector matches elements based on the contents of their class attribute. - MDN


Combine the Class Selector


Comma Combinator

Any element matching A and/or B. - MDN


The Universal Selector

Just Select everything!


Combine the Universal Selector


Adjacent Sibling Selector

The adjacent sibling combinator (+) separates two selectors and matches the second element only if it immediately follows the first element, and both are children of the same parent element. - MDN


General Sibling Selector

The general sibling combinator (~) separates two selectors and matches the second element only if it follows the first element (though not necessarily immediately), and both are children of the same parent element. - MDN


Child Selector

The child combinator (>) is placed between two CSS selectors. It matches only those elements matched by the second selector that are the children of elements matched by the first. - MDN


First Child Pseudo-selector

The :first-child CSS pseudo-class represents the first element among a group of sibling elements. - MDN


Only Child Pseudo-selector

The :only-child CSS pseudo-class represents an element without any siblings. This is the same as :first-child:last-child or :nth-child(1):nth-last-child(1), but with a lower specificity. - MDN


Last Child Pseudo-selector

The :last-child CSS pseudo-class represents the last element among a group of sibling elements. - MDN


Nth Child Pseudo-selector

The :nth-child() CSS pseudo-class matches elements based on their position in a group of siblings. - MDN


Nth Last Child Selector

The :nth-last-child() CSS pseudo-class matches elements based on their position among a group of siblings, counting from the end. - MDN


First of Type Selector

The :first-of-type CSS pseudo-class represents the first element of its type among a group of sibling elements. - MDN


Nth of Type Selector

The :nth-of-type() CSS pseudo-class matches elements of a given type, based on their position among a group of siblings. - MDN


Nth-of-type Selector with Formula

🔮 Note:
:nth-of-type(even)
:nth-of-type(odd)
:nth-of-type(2)
:nth-of-type(2n)
:nth-of-type(3n-1)
:nth-of-type(2n+2)

Only of Type Selector

The :only-of-type CSS pseudo-class represents an element that has no siblings of the same type. - MDN


Last of Type Selector

The :last-of-type CSS pseudo-class represents the last element of its type among a group of sibling elements. - MDN


Empty Selector

The :empty CSS pseudo-class represents any element that has no children. Children can be either element nodes or text (including whitespace). Comments, processing instructions, and CSS content do not affect whether an element is considered empty. - MDN


Negation Pseudo-class

The :not() CSS pseudo-class represents elements that do not match a list of selectors. Since it prevents specific items from being selected, it is known as the negation pseudo-class. - MDN


Attribute Selector

Attribute selectors are a special kind of selector that will match elements based on their attributes and attribute values. Their generic syntax consists of square brackets ([]) containing an attribute name followed by an optional condition to match against the value of the attribute. Attribute selectors can be divided into two categories depending on the way they match attribute values: Presence and value attribute selectors and Substring value attribute selectors. - MDN


Attribute Value Selector


Attribute Starts With Selector

This selector will select all elements with the attribute attr for which the value starts with val. - MDN


Attribute Ends With Selector

This selector will select all elements with the attribute attr for which the value ends with val. - MDN


Attribute Wildcard Selector

This selector will select all elements with the attribute attr for which the value contains the substring val. (A substring is simply part of a string, e.g. "cat" is a substring in the string "caterpillar".) - MDN

🎉 Congratulations, you’ve completed 🎉