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How the alt-right brought #SyriaHoax to America

Tracing the “false flag” claim back to a pro-Assad website

Diagram of how the “false flag” claim spread.
Source: Mike Cernovich / Twitter

Starting in Syria

Source: Al Masdar news / Twitter
Source: Al-Masdar. Screenshot showing the embedded post. The tweet itself was archived on April 4.
Source: Al-Masdar. Note the pattern of underlining. The original tweets were archived here and here on April 7.
Diagram showing the spread of the Al-Masdar story.
Source: DFRLab. Diagram showing the spread of the fake tanks story.
Source: Infowars
Source: Infowars. Screenshot showing its use of the Orient TV claim.
Source: Infowars.
Comparison of the underlining used by Al-Masdar (left) and Infowars (right).
Comparison of the images used by Al-Masdar (left) and Infowars (right).

Spreading the “hoax” online

Source: @magicpoledancer / Twitter
Source: Trendinalia / Twitter.
Source: @magicpoledancer / Twitter
Source: Mike Cernovich / Twitter.
Source: Mike Cernovich / Twitter.
Source: Mike Cernovich / Twitter.
The top forty users of the #SyriaHoax hashtag between 16:00 and 22:00 UTC, with the number of tweets. The total figure for these posts is 3,007.
Source: @Dr_Trumpenstein / Twitter.
Source: @whosleakednow / Twitter. Archived on April 7.
Source: @J_DPatriot / Twitter. Archived on April 7.

Conclusion

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@DFRLab

@AtlanticCouncil's Digital Forensic Research Lab. Catalyzing a global network of digital forensic researchers, following conflicts in real time.