#MinskMonitor: New Electronic Warfare in Ukraine?

Drone video reveals unidentified system in Russian, separatist territory

@DFRLab
@DFRLab
Mar 24, 2018 · 3 min read
(Source: Facebook / Come Back Alive)

Earlier this week, the Ukrainian NGO “Come Back Alive” published a drone video showing a Russian-led separatist outpost in the Donbas. The most interesting item revealed in the footage was an electronic warfare system.

(Source: Facebook / Come Back Alive)

We geolocated this video footage to a gas station in non-government-controlled territory to the north of Horlivka.

(Left: Facebook / Come Back Alive. Right: Google Earth)

The featured gas station is a key location in non-government-controlled territory, as it is near a major highway that leads to the Russian, separatist stronghold of Horlivka. By comparing the location of the incident with the red shaded areas of Russian, separatist control, courtesy of LiveUAMap, we can see how close it is to the frontline.

Map showing Russian/separatist control in red (Source: LiveUAMap). Super-imposed photograph (Source: Facebook / Come Back Alive).

As the NGO described, they noticed a flickering light (possibly an infrared emission) from what they suspect is an electronic warfare system. Soon after this happened, the drone was rendered temporarily inoperable.

The suspected electronic warfare system. (Source: Facebook / Come Back Alive)

It was difficult to identify any specific system, as this suspected weapon does not look like other Russian electronic warfare complexes found in the Donbas, such as the Leer-3 featured in a separate @DFRLab investigation.

We reached out to Arthur Holland Michel at Bard College’s Center for the Study of the Drone to assess what type of system could have been filmed by the Ukrainian NGO. From the Center’s database of counter-drone systems, Michel did not recognize any of the products in the database. He noted that if a laser was actually being used, there would have been physical damage to the drone. Additionally, there are no counter-drone systems in the database that would create the light seen in the video.

Russian-led separatist forces have used a number of jamming systems to target Ukrainian and OSCE SMM (Special Monitoring Mission) to Ukraine drones, including advanced systems that could have only come from Russia. While Russia’s involvement in providing soldiers and hard weaponry to separatists in the Donbas has slowed in the past few years, it has continued to escalate its support in secondary areas, such as in countering aerial surveillance from Ukrainian forces and OSCE SMM monitors. We will continue to monitor the use of electronic warfare systems, and provide a more concrete identification of this system if it becomes available.


Follow the latest Minsk II Violations via the @DFRLab’s #MinskMonitor.

For more in-depth analysis from our regional experts follow the Atlantic Council’s Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center. Or subscribe to UkraineAlert.

DFRLab

@AtlanticCouncil’s Digital Forensic Research Lab. Catalyzing a global network of digital forensic researchers, following conflicts in real time.

@DFRLab

Written by

@DFRLab

@AtlanticCouncil's Digital Forensic Research Lab. Catalyzing a global network of digital forensic researchers, following conflicts in real time.

DFRLab

DFRLab

@AtlanticCouncil’s Digital Forensic Research Lab. Catalyzing a global network of digital forensic researchers, following conflicts in real time.

Welcome to a place where words matter. On Medium, smart voices and original ideas take center stage - with no ads in sight. Watch
Follow all the topics you care about, and we’ll deliver the best stories for you to your homepage and inbox. Explore
Get unlimited access to the best stories on Medium — and support writers while you’re at it. Just $5/month. Upgrade