Climate: Too much diagnosis, too little prescription

Denis in Boston
Dialogue & Discourse
10 min readJun 11, 2019

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Too many climate change writers seem to want to outdo Al Gore who first brought attention to the matter. Gore shared a Nobel Peace Prize with the UN’s IPCC for his effort but those who came later have added a little precision to the estimate but they have not fundamentally changed anything. Now that we know the score, it’s important to move from diagnosis to prescription lest we all sound like a bunch of whining babies. Climate change has solutions, but no one is going to bestow a new environment on us, we’re going to have to work for it starting with plans and prescriptions. This piece points to a forward path away from simple diagnosis and toward workable solutions.

Cimate diagnoses abound. What’s needed now aare prescriptions based on science.

The climate crisis is eliciting an unusual response for something described as a crisis. It’s not that civilization is doing little to bend the curve away from catastrophe; after all, there have been numerous failed efforts to do something, such as the Kyoto Protocol and the Paris Climate Agreements spearheaded by Barak Obama. But virtually all past agreements have been a bust. Part of the reason might have been a lack of useful technology to bring solutions to life. More on that below.

So far, the human species has done a pretty good job of working through the Elizabeth Kubler-Ross model for the five stages of grief found in her seminal book, “On Death and

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Denis in Boston
Dialogue & Discourse

Used to write a lot more about science, tech, econ, politics etc. I spend my time reading and painting with exercise for good measure. Looking for more.