A Trip to the Beach

Tom Herbert connects with nature, food and people in Do Wild Baking

The Do Book Company
Jun 6, 2018 · 7 min read

How to build a campfire

Cooking in the wild is no fun without the fire. My ‘go to’ fire building technique is: having cleared a space, start with the tinder, scrunched up paper or birch bark. Then scout-style, make a teepee of kindling around and above the tinder, leaving a gap that you can push your hand through for lighting. Finally, add a few larger sticks or split logs that will easily catch — also in a teepee fashion. With a stack of drywood to one side, light the fire, blowing it into life and adding more fuel as required.

Cooking outdoors

There are many different ways to cook on a fire. On a stick is the most incidental and child-friendly way of cooking. For most of us it started as a marshmallow on the end of a stick dangled over a fire. Some foods lend themselves to being dropped or placed directly on the embers. Mussels and other shellfish can be cooked in this way without the need for a pan or a pot. Or you can set up a grill. In essence this is your basic barbecue, a metal grill set above hot embers, for grilling meat, fish and vegetables. It’s also not a bad way to keep things warm. Here are my recipes for seafood.

Mussels Baked in Embers

I love mussels. They’re the most carbon-positive form of protein. I’ve tried them every which way, and for me, hands down, this is the best. Seafood doesn’t get simpler than this.

Grilled Mackerel with Burnt Lemon

Mackerel is best enjoyed fresh. As you can see from my introductory anecdote, it is simplicity itself to cook, giving you more time to enjoy the beach and sea.





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Do Book Company

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