Setting new record, Qatar temps fall to lowest they’ve been in 50 years

Photo for illustrative purposes only. Credit: Kamran Hanif/Flickr

Temperatures in Qatar set a new record after falling to 1.5C (35F) yesterday morning in Abu Samra, according to local forecasters.

The previous lowest recorded minimum temperature in Qatar was 3.8C (39F) in January 1964, in Mesaieed.

In a statement, the Qatar Meteorology Department (MET) said a change in wind direction around 5:40am caused temperatures to drop “dramatically” by 7.5C within 30 minutes.

Photo for illustrative purposes only. Credit: Ahmed Abdel Hamid/Flickr

It added that temperatures have approached record lows in cities across Qatar this weekend, not just near the Saudi border.

Elsewhere, a cold front brought on snow in the UAE and Oman. According to Al Jazeera, another Shamal wind is expected to blow through the region this coming weekend.

Things are supposed to heat up a bit today though, with temps in Qatar to range from 12C to 21C.

But the northern and southern-most parts of the country will still see temps fall to the single digits at night and in the early mornings.

Heater safety

When the weather gets cold in Qatar, hospitals often see an uptick in scald injuries and burns from fires and electrical devices.

To stay safe, Hamad Medical Corp. (HMC) has recommended following this advice when using space heaters:

Photo for illustrative purposes only. Credit: John Liu/Flickr

Shop safe

Only buy the devices from reputable stores and ensure they are “UL” certified, which demonstrates they meet international safety standards.

No extension cords

Plug electric heaters directly into wall outlets instead of into extension cords.

Photo for illustrative purposes only. Credit: Adam McGovern/Flickr

These high-powered devices can cause electrical systems to overload and lead to blown fuses or the melting of wiring, which can cause a house fire.

Avoid flammable things

Position heaters far (at least 1m or 3 feet) from flammable materials like curtains, table clothes, blankets and bedding.

Educate kids

Keep heaters away from the busiest parts of your home and teach children to avoid them to prevent burns.

Use a timer

Make sure that your heater’s automatic timer is working. This can limit the amount of time the device is on and reduce the risk of overheating and fires.

How are you coping with winter? Thoughts?

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