You are losing potential leads on your parked domain names

It’s 2018. Let’s face facts. If people want something on the internet, chances are they are either Googling it or searching directly on Amazon, eBay, etc. Today’s public understands the basics of internet, and the few who don’t are slowly phasing out.

Aside from the ultra-premium generic domain names such as insurance.com or cars.com, the traffic you are receiving on your “brandable” domain or your “key-words” domain is most likely not genuine nor looking for any specific product. It is far more likely that they came to your website in error — perhaps they fat fingered a key or they just fell asleep on their keyboard.


Nobody is going to etv.org to buy a new TV.

Let’s look at the picture above. Look at the ads and think to yourself whether the person who just came to etv.org is going to click on any of those. What exactly is an “eTV” anyway?

The problem with advertising on domain names is that not all domain names have a target audience. The parking company algorithm cannot detect enough keywords from the domain name to generate half-decent advertisements. So they just throw in any ad and hope that it’s relevant.

Let’s take another example.

I love listening to Brazilian music while forgetting my iPhone 5S password and biking on islands on my Harley Davidson with my HIV positive bird-loving bookkeeping grandparents!

The advertisements listed are all over the place! How are they even remotely related to each other let alone to hdc.net?

So domain parking advertisements are definitely not up-to-snuff for some domains.


With increasing demand for privacy and user-data protection (such as GDPR), we are slowly moving away from the current WHOIS model and eventually, parked domains like the above examples will find it even harder to convert visitors into actual leads.

We wrote an article about how many clicks it takes for the average user to contact a domain owner that talks about this exact problem — check it out here.

So what’s the answer for domainers? It’s time to adapt and evolve with the changing markets — nobody is coming to your custom domain looking for products or deals. Unless you own a multi-million dollar domain name, chances are that the actual foot-traffic your domain receives is minuscule.

Let’s set up landing pages to convert those visitors into actual tangible leads. Here’s an article we recently wrote about the pros and cons of landing pages.