Review: Soulshine Cannabis

Soulshine Cannabis

Not long ago, the place Soulshine Cannabis calls home hosted skaters mastering their tricks on half-pipes. But today, the space that formerly housed a large indoor skate park has folks focused on the mastery of another craft: sustainably and consciously-grown high-quality bud. Co-owners Mike Mercer and Patrick Walznak first planned to start a medium-sized tier II grow, but plans changed when they were offered a 50,000-square-foot warehouse. Despite this massive space, they limited their production to the yield of six grow rooms. As an outsider, that may seem small, but Soulshine will make you think again.

“In eight weeks, we’re in 19 locations in Washington. Our goal is to double that in the next three months,” Mercer proclaimed. The sheer density of the first room’s crop of Appalachian Power, a Soulshine exclusive, made that goal look more than attainable. Mercer credited Advanced Growing Systems (AGS) for implementing systems that enabled these high yields. Soulshine and AGS are redefining grow efficiency by granularly controlling every element — including how they source water and power.

Each room recycles 200 gallons of water from the AC units daily, and the savings from their occupancy sensor lighting are able to power 1.5 rooms. Sustainability extends beyond their systems, as all Soulshine packaging is entirely compostable; this includes containers, stickers and labels. In the trimming area, Bam Bam by Sister Nancy played as Mercer spoke on Soulshine’s partners that share these principles. You’ll find their logo on Millenium Marijuana and Pearl Extracts’ products, but what stood out was their partnership with a local non-profit. They contribute a portion of their sales to Emerald City Pet Rescue, whose focus is to rescue and rehabilitate neglected animals. Success is on the horizon for Soulshine Cannabis, and their sustainable, conscious model tells us they’re here to stay.

“In eight weeks, we’re in 19 locations in Washington. Our goal is to double that in the next three months.”
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