Jump: a faster way to open your GitHub repos

A couple months ago, I realized just how much time I spend doing this:

  • Open Chrome
  • Cmd+T for a new tab
  • Start typing the name of a repo
  • Backspace because it’s not showing up in my Chrome suggestions
  • Type it a little differently
  • Backspace all the way and start with https://github.com/dropseed/...
  • Finally see the one I’m looking for, arrow down and hit enter

Once we really started proliferating repos, especially for dependencies.io, it became really obvious just how painful this was getting to be.

So, as a developer would do, I “developed” some shit.

I’ve been looking for an excuse to try Electron for a while (I’m a “try new things I don’t fully understand” kinda guy). After some recent (good) experiences with Create React App, I thought that might be a good place to start. That actually did work ok for a little bit, but eventually I hit the point where it felt like I had to “eject” it to get what I needed done. All of the sudden I had a whole bunch of extra scripts and config files, with very little idea of what was really happening and a cluttered repo to boot. Someday maybe I’ll dig deep into JS and figure those things out, but it’s not what I use everyday and didn’t want to take the time. A bunch of bumbling around and I re-landed on Electron Forge and now have what feels like a manageable setup with the parts I understand and care about in front of me, and the rest abstracted away. All of that is to say, if you’re starting an Electron app for the first time and don’t want to get bogged down in all of the details, I highly recommend taking a look at electron-forge.

Anyway, the point is that I now have an ultra-streamlined workflow for opening my GitHub repos.

It looks more like this:

  • Cmd+J to open Jump (no matter what application I’m in currently)
  • Type 3–4 characters of the repo name (p.s. fuzzaldrin is pretty handy for filtering this kind of thing)
  • Hit enter

And it literally looks more like this:

Not bad, right?

It is by no means perfect, but it does in fact do the job. And by, “do the job”, I mean that I use it 30+ times a day and shudder in disgust if I’m at a computer where it isn’t installed and realize I have to go back to, “the old way of doing things.”

You can download the latest release of it here: https://github.com/dropseed/jump/releases/latest

Pull requests are very, very welcome!