Yes, We Do Need Subsidized Childcare and Universal Preschool

Insights from Educate, 15th Edition

Jennifer Osborne
Educate.

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Welcome to Insights from Educate, a curated weekly newsletter of professional learning and inspiration from authentic voices in education.

Photo by BBC Creative on Unsplash

Consider these stats: middle-class families spend 14% of their income on childcare while lower-income families spend upwards of 35%.

To be honest, this seems a little low. My husband and I are both teachers, and when our children were young, we struggled to pay for daycare while we worked. So much so that I resigned from my teaching position to be a stay-at-home mom as it didn’t make sense to spend my entire salary on daycare and preschool.

Joya Misra, Professor of Sociology and Public Policy at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, writes: “As a scholar who studies government support for working families in different countries, I know that the United States spends substantially less on early education and child care than comparable nations.”

Biden’s new American Families Plan has taken aim at the child care challenges in the U.S. (with a $225 billion annual price tag). The plan will provide free, universal preschool for 3- and 4-year-olds and subsidize…

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Jennifer Osborne
Educate.

Educational Leadership Policy Ph.D. Student ⎪Editor of Educate. medium.com/educate-pub