Design Sprint techniques

One of the key aspects of a successful Enterprise Design Sprint is the customization. Even that the adoption of Design Thinking structure is common for all Design Sprint instances, there are various workshop techniques available to match a specific sprint challenge and stakeholder’s expectations.

This is a short summary of workshop techniques that I have used so far with the ambition to update with interesting resources that I plan to use in near future.

User Reviews

I have great results with User Reviews, which forces people to formulate a tangible benefit of the product that are making so significant impact on user life, that she actually decide to write an app review. On the other hand, the subsequent design process can benefit from the skeptical voices sharing negative reviews, by uncovering possible adoption barriers or gaps early. This is helping us to understand, that even if we build the best possible product, would we satisfy our users?

Sample Review format.
Workshop task.

Tomorrow Headlines

Tomorrow headlines is a Service Design technique that I adapted for a product impact validation task. Some product adoption is easy, as it comes with mandatory process change. But some other adoption is very hard, as people always have many alternatives to achieve a single goal, and there are many other behavioural factors that the good product needs to accommodate. A great start is to start by formulating a product announcement — How do we want to communicate the product benefits? In my current world, this comes down to crafting an Email announcement, where the headline would represent the Email subject. In a subsequent validation activity, we actually send the email to future users and interview people who are receiving the announcement.

Teachback

Teachback is a great technique that can have many different forms. Similarly to Tomorrow Headlines, we can validate the product impact by asking users to share what they have learn from announcement email.

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