Taipei IN Style

By Eva Fydrych

As some of the readers may remember, Fashion Studio Magazine travelled to Taipei last month to bring you exclusive coverage from Taiwan’s biggest fashion event — Taipei IN Style.

The vibrant capital of Taiwan is one of the most inspiring Asian cities. Modern, friendly, and full of various attractions and fun activities, Taipei is a constant source of inspiration and won’t disappoint any travellers looking for a unique and trendy destination.

Taipei IN Style took place from 10–13 November 2016 and featured 121 Asian brands from Taiwan, Japan, and Hong Kong. If you missed our coverage from Day 1, you can find it here.

Photos by Eva Fydrych / Fashion Studio Magazine and courtesy of TTF (2)

Day Two

Second day of Taipei IN Style started with the Fashion Footwear Runway’16 where local brands such as GIDER, F•KNIT, WALKING ZONE, and MOMENTANÉE presented their latest collections. Fashionable designs in sports and leisure, romantic wedding stilettos, and gentlemen’s shoes dominated the runway.

It is worth mentioning that Taiwan is home to a well established footwear industry with high quality materials and fine craftsmanship.

GIDER — handmade in Taiwan (Photo courtesy of TTF)

Emerging Designers

Second event of the day, The Final Selection Show of Taiwan Fashion Design Award / Sweater Design Contest, took place in the afternoon and featured emerging designers competing for the final prize. Last year, the contest wasn’t open to international press, so it was a pleasant surprise to be able to attend the show this year.

You can view the winning designs here (Chun-Hsiang TANG), here (Ksenija Novakovskaia), and here (Yi-Chun HSIEH). Congratulations to all the talented designers who took part in the competition!

Creative design by Kai-Yi CHANG (Photo by Eva Fydrych / Fashion Studio Magazine)

Japanese Trends

It was also the first time Japan’s PR01. SHOWROOM exhibited at Taipei IN Style. They displayed three designer labels including GROWING PAINS, JERRY PINK, and SUB AGE, which presented the aesthetics of Japanese youth subcultures.

Read the full article here:

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